7

I was a PhD student and working on a paper. My adviser told me that he could not support me anymore so I left him. Now I am wondering if I could publish that paper on my own. There were 3 other coauthors on that paper but I was the first author and main idea was from me.

26

Your paper had other authors. Generally, if you want to publish it, you have to communicate with the other co-authors (whether they were your supervisor or not).

Regardless of who the first author on a paper is, if other individuals made authorship-worthy contributions to the work, you can't publish it without communicating with them first.

  • 11
    In fact, you can't publish until all of the authors agree to publish- part of the process of submitting a paper for publication is making a statement that you have the agreement of all coauthors. Most journals and conferences will email back to all of the authors telling them that they've been named as coauthors on a submission. If someone doesn't agree with the paper, then they can very easily stop it. This is one reason that it is so important to be clear on who the authors will be and what tasks each will do before starting to prepare a paper or doing the research for that matter. – Brian Borchers Nov 3 '14 at 5:05
  • 2
    @BrianBorchers While it's true that good agreements make good friends, it's often very difficult to determine contributions (not to mention their relative importance) prior to doing the research. Author lists can't always be determined before doing any work. – Marc Claesen Nov 4 '14 at 7:40
-5

When an academic paper is produced, the copyright generally belongs primarily to the institution at which the work was done and secondarily to the author(s) of the work.

Therefore you must seek and obtain the permission of the institution at which you were enrolled before disseminating the work in any form, whether electronic or otherwise or presenting it at a meeting or conference. Failure to do this would represent a breach of academic ethics and could leave you open to legal proceedings from the institution in question.

  • 12
    the copyright generally belongs primarily to the institution at which the work was done - As a general statement, that's not true at all - many institutions do not hold copyright interests in work produced by their students or faculty. And institutions that require institutional permission to publish are very, very rare. – ff524 Nov 3 '14 at 16:32
  • This is misleading. Copyright and authorship are two different things. I don't know where you get the idea that copyright belongs to the institution, but in any case whether or not publishing something would be plagiarism or some other form of academic misconduct has nothing to do with copyright in the legal sense. – jwg Nov 3 '14 at 16:33
  • dac2002- do you have any evidence to support this assertion? – P.Windridge Nov 3 '14 at 18:26
  • 1
    you must seek and obtain the permission of the institution at which you were enrolled before disseminating the work in any form — This has absolutely not been true at any of the dozen or so institutions I've been affiliated with, in four different countries, as an undergrad, grad student, student, postdoc, professor, or sabbatical visitor. – JeffE Nov 4 '14 at 2:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.