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If someone scores quite high on the GRE, how and where would they list it? Or would they even list it at all?

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    A CV for what? (Related: Should a CV for a fellowship application ever include test scores?) – ff524 Oct 20 '14 at 4:57
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    I don't think you should. I can't recall ever seeing test scores listed on a CV. Nobody really cares about GRE scores except graduate admissions committees, and they get the scores straight from ETS anyway. – Nate Eldredge Oct 20 '14 at 6:31
  • I guess it came to mind because of the tendency to list GPA when it's high enough – Jonathan Landrum Oct 20 '14 at 13:18
  • Field dependent, GRE section dependent. In my field (physics), about 25% of graduate school applicants had perfect scores on the math GRE when I was preparing for the test. In that case a perfect score was not worth a lot. Physicists also put low weight on the verbal score. – Anonymous Physicist Oct 20 '14 at 18:29
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Copying my comment:

I don't think you should. I can't recall ever seeing test scores listed on a CV. Nobody really cares about GRE scores except graduate admissions committees, and they get the scores straight from ETS anyway.

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    Additionally, GRE scores may be meaningless or misinterpreted with the score scale changes in recent years. Telling someone you got a 170 in Math means nothing to someone who took the GRE on the 200-800 scale. If they want to know, they'll ask. – Compass Nov 24 '14 at 17:16
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A C.V. should list everything that is significant in your accomplishments at your stage of career. Before you get into grad school, a good GRE score may be significant. After you're in, not so much.

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    A good GRE score doesn't mean anything before getting into grad school either, because the only point of the GRE is that it's required for US grad schools. As Nate says in his comment to the OP, those schools obtain those scores anyway, so there is no reason to ever put it in your CV. – Sverre Oct 25 '14 at 15:41

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