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As a researcher in industry, I am interested in pursuing personal projects in my field (computer science) in order to improve my potential employability. With that objective in mind, I'd like to publish updates about the state of these personal projects (including partial results, and maybe code) on several social networks.

Now, lets assume that this work could eventually lead to publishable results in my field.

My question is: is keeping a portfolio of personal projects compatible with publishing papers about these projects? Which steps should I follow in order to avoid others to take advantage of my ideas, and in order to avoid problems during the eventual blind peer review process?

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    For your last sentence, is your concern that your public portfolio might allow a "blind" peer reviewer to identify you as the author of a paper you submit? My field doesn't use double-blind peer review, but in any case my understanding is that the reviewer can pretty easily figure out who the author is, regardless. (For example, by looking at the references and seeing who is cited most often.) – Nate Eldredge Jul 14 '14 at 15:30
  • @NateEldredge yes, that is my concern. – Pablo Suau Jul 14 '14 at 15:53
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    Depending on your area of computer science, reviewing might be single-blind (the reviewers know who you are but you don't know who they are), rather than double-blind. Theory is mostly single-blind. – David Richerby Jul 14 '14 at 20:16
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is keeping a portfolio of personal projects compatible with publishing papers about these projects?

Yes, it's certainly compatible with publishing. It would roughly fall under the concept of Open Science.

Which steps should I follow in order to avoid others to take advantage of my ideas, and in order to avoid problems during the eventual blind peer review process?

  1. Use websites with some amount of academic reputation in your field to make your material accessible. Examples are preprint servers such as arxiv.org for scientific reports of (preliminary) results, or common code hosting sites such as Sourceforge or github for code, if available together with appropriate documentation on the project websites.
  2. Publish anything under your real name to avoid being accused of plagiarism later on. Publishing such things on potential multi-author sites such as Wikipedia or StackExchange is not a good idea at all in this case.
  3. When making something you intend for later scholarly publication online available, make sure that it get's a credible date stamp. The sites mentioned in point 1 would work fine with that.

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