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I have my Bachelor's degree in Business and Marketing and my Master's degree in Computer and information Science.

This year I have applied to 3 different universities in Germany for taking another Master degree in Computer Science and have been told that my bachelor's degree does not correspond to the one I am applying and have been rejected for those 3 universities with the same reason

Next year I am planning to apply for PHD program and would like to have advise from experts, some people say there are specific PHD programs which require both Business and Computer Science degrees. I was wondering if anyone could give some resources where I could find best matching universities for my case.

Thanks in advance :)

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    The answer to "what PhD to choose" depends much more on what you want to do after the PhD than what you did before. – ff524 Jul 4 '14 at 14:46
  • Maybe they are unsure on how well you'll perform. If you could get to work in some Research Lab/Center in the research area that you are interested in, this could help your application (by showing real motivation and understanding of what you are getting into). – cabad Jul 4 '14 at 14:50
  • @cabad Unlikely. Admission in Germany is typically not like in the US. To a large extend, admission is a formal process executed by bureaucrats, which mostly just check boxes. – xLeitix Jul 4 '14 at 14:56
  • ff524 - if I am going to do a research then it would be better to have a relevant topic to my experience and studies. For this reason I am trying to find a relevant field. – Grigor Nazaryan Jul 4 '14 at 19:03
  • Cabad - as an economist I have a 3 years of experience in accounting, I was employeed as a head accountant in one of companies in my country. Further as a computer scientist which is my master degree, I have another 3 years of experience as an engineer in VMware inc. – Grigor Nazaryan Jul 4 '14 at 19:08
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I believe that there are different approaches when someone goes towards a Phd program. You either are fascinated about a research topic and try to find phd programs which treat this topic, and you stubbornly try to get a position there. On the other hand, you are not that much fascinated about the topic and the science behind it, instead you like the letter which will stand in front (or at the end of your name) when you obtain the Phd.

First define in which group do you belong. Being in the first group is more enjoyable, but it is limits your selections when you will look for programs and professors for certain topics. Being in the second group will gives you more options when applying, but bear in mind the Phd is a marathon (different than an exam), it is something that you will have to deal with for at least 3-5 years of your life. And what's next then? Do you go to academia or industry? Have you thought about that?

I see that you have applied only to German universities, but why not others.

Regarding you background, I could see you fitting in any program that does Business Informatics. Run a search on that topic and see if there is something useful for you.

Good luck!

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  • u're welcome, hope it helped a bit! – Kristof Tak Jul 14 '14 at 18:04
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Doing a PhD is an investment of energies, efforts and time. Choosing it on the base of national legal constraints/requirements is a big mistake, in my opinion. You should choose your PhD according to what you want to study.

My experience is that in UK we don't have such strict checks on your degrees. I am a PhD student in Computer Science and I work everyday with epidemiologists, biologists, statisticians, mathematicians, logicians and also people with business degrees. Cross-disciplinary PhDs here are well considered.

Focus on what you would like to study. Do you want to go deep in business (maybe using your computer science skills) or do you prefer to contribute, hopefully, to computer science? Which one do you feel suits more you? You can start filtering universities, schools and countries only after you find the answers to those questions.

Good luck. ;)

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