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I do have little research experience on "Web Security" and I made some inventions in that. I have patented my inventions and now when I was trying to apply for Masters by Research in Information Technology in some X University they are asking for Research Publications. I never came across them in my past and I don't know its importance. May anyone tell me

  1. Its role to the admissions committee.
  2. How important they are as compared to patents.
  3. How and where can I release my Research Publications?
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If you're going to be doing a master's degree by research, then admissions committees are going to want to see evidence of any previous research that you've done. That way, you're less of a risk for them to admit you, because you've already learned many of the skills you'll need to be successful.

The "currency" for establishing this are patents and research publications. I assume you're familiar with patents, since you ask for a comparison. Basically, research publications will be considered at least as important as patents, as they generally represent a significant amount of original research. (Patents may be a matter of development rather than research.)

As for how and where to release research publications, that depends on your field. In CS, my understanding is that generally means that you have to publish your research in conference papers, which means that you'll have to get your research work written up and submitted to a conference. Then you'll need to get your paper accepted, and then you can publish.

If you don't have any publications, don't worry. If you still have research experience, a recommendation letter from a research supervisor can also help to establish your qualifications. (Absent some evidence, though, most graduate programs will remain skeptical.)

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    Some category errors here: Computer scientists submit, review, revise, and publish conference papers; the talks are almost incidental. And research publications (in journals, conference proceedings, or even technical reports) are considerably more important than patents for admission to CS grad programs. But patents are certainly better than no research experience at all. – JeffE Jul 5 '12 at 23:17
  • Thanks—like I said, I'm not an expert in CS ("my understanding is"), although I collaborate with a few. I've fixed most of the obvious errors, I hope. – aeismail Jul 6 '12 at 5:56
  • Thanks a lot for your answer. Now my doubt is, writing up an essay (of 10 pages) and submitting to IEEE (List of journals, magazines, documents, papers etc) will that be enough to fulfill admissions committee requirements? Else what do they need? where should I publish my research description? – Meutex Jul 6 '12 at 15:51
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    Publications are not normally a requirement for admission to a graduate program—although they certainly help. If it is a requirement, then the program will make that clear. And generally, the standard for research publications is something that has been peer-reviewed: someone else has critically read and provided feedback to assess (and improve) the quality of the manuscript. – aeismail Jul 6 '12 at 21:28
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I think they are asking for your publications in case you have any, but I highly doubt that publications will be necessary to get into a masters program. It just something to add to your application to give a more complete picture of you.

  • Thanks a lot for your answer. Now my doubt is, writing up an essay (of 10 pages) and submitting to IEEE (List of journals, magazines, documents, papers etc) will that be enough to fulfill admissions committee requirements? Else what do they need? where should I publish my research description? – Meutex Jul 6 '12 at 15:51
  • I suspect that your grades will be the main criteria for getting into the masters degree. If in doubt, make a phone call to the admissions office. – Dave Clarke Jul 6 '12 at 19:45
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List your patents in the place where they ask for publications. It is a good substitute at this point.

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    Yes and no. It's certainly better than listing nothing, so this is useful advice. However, I don't think it's likely to be considered a good substitute. The problem is that getting a patent implies little or nothing about the scholarly value of the invention, and the bar for patentability is very low. To a first approximation, getting a patent will impress the admissions committee about as much as publishing in a journal nobody has ever heard of. – Anonymous Mathematician Jul 6 '12 at 3:32
  • Thanks a lot for your answer. Now my doubt is, writing up an essay (of 10 pages) and submitting to IEEE (List of journals, magazines, documents, papers etc) will that be enough to fulfill admissions committee requirements? Else what do they need? where should I publish my research description? – Meutex Jul 6 '12 at 15:50
  • It isn't an admission committee requirement. They just want to know if you have publications. If you don't, I don't think you'll be able to write it up and submit it and get it published before the deadline, unless you're applying for 2014. Your 'research description' is likely an essay of what you want to do for your research, or what you have done. This doesn't get published in IEEE, just written in the application. – mankoff Jul 6 '12 at 16:38

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