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Usually, and especially for the IEEE conferences, it is easy to know whether a conference is good or not. For example, top-tier, second-tier and third-tier conferences are known and agreed upon.

For example, the IEEE ICC (1st tier) conference is better than IEEE Globecom (2nd tier). My question is, how to define the tiers for the OSA meetings and conferences.

Is there anyone familiar with the OSA meetings and conferences who can shed the light on how to interpret the acceptance in an OSA conference? What tier does an OSA conference belong to? How to know it, etc....

Kindly note that I am not asking if the acceptance as a poster, or even a talk is prestigious. I am strictly interested in the classification of the meeting and conference.

I know that a poster acceptance is less than being accepted for a talk, and that it is merely for discussions and feedback on new or emerging research topics. However, I believe that a poster presentation in a top tier, is better than a poster presentation in a second tier, therefore, I am asking about the OSA meetings and conference classifications.

Thank you.

  • Did you talk about it with your advisor? colleagues? Why did you send a paper if you don't know about the venue? – user102 Jun 6 '14 at 14:41
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    The OSA is a reputable institution, but being accepted for a poster presentation is not 'prestigious' in any way. The purpose of having a poster there is more to get feedback on your work from experts (and there will be experts). – Cape Code Jun 6 '14 at 15:07
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AFAIK for disciplines related to the Optical Society of America (which is a well-recognized organization), the most prestigious things are journals - either by it (for example, JOSA A, JOSA B, Optics Express) or not (e.g. general physics or general science journals). When it comes to conference, its importance is related only to speakers/participants (so there is no general rule).

In any case, a poster presentation is never prestigious, be it by OSA or not (usually almost everything gets accepted).

I would ask that not every field have well-defined tiers for conferences. For example in mine, there isn't. And if you care for prestige - if you can't tell the difference - the chances are people seeing you CV won't be able to tell the difference either.

Usually review of abstracts (especially if no feedback is given) is to decide which things are suitable for talks (the best), posters (almost all others), and which - neither (they make no sense, are on another topic, of very poor quality or are OK but there is limited space for posters for some reason).

  • Thank you for your response. Can you please elaborate on the "... be it by OSA or not (usually almost everything gets accepted).", What is the use of the review process then? – BHamza Jun 6 '14 at 15:12
  • Could you give details to a particular process? Usually review of abstracts is to decide which things are suitable for talks (the best), posters (almost all others), and which - neither (make no sense, are on other topic, of very poor quality or are OK but there is limited space for posters for some reason). – Piotr Migdal Jun 6 '14 at 15:14
  • Yes, I think this explains the review process in meetings and conferences by OSA. However, this does not answer my question. For example, the IEEE ICC (1st tier) conference is better than IEEE Globecom (2nd tier). My question is, how to define the tiers for the OSA meetings and conferences. – BHamza Jun 6 '14 at 15:36
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    Not every field have well-defined tiers for conferences. For example in mine, there isn't. And if you care for prestige - if you can't tell the difference - the chances are people seeing you CV won't be able to tell the difference either. – Piotr Migdal Jun 6 '14 at 17:01
  • Alright, make sense. Please add these comments to your answer so I can accept it as an answer to my question. Thank you for your valuable discussion. Appreciate it. – BHamza Jun 6 '14 at 17:29

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