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When requesting the diploma/transcript for a new job, the transcript is signed by the current registrar, as transcript has issuance date. However, a diploma does not have issuance date (only the date awarded). Will the university reprint the diploma with its original signatures or generate a new diploma with signatures of current university officials?

I mean is it possible to check when a diploma has been issued from its signature or the signatures are always the same as the original print on the date awarded?

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    You probably have to ask the university in question. I can imagine different institutions might handle this in different ways. Why does it matter? – Nate Eldredge May 29 '14 at 23:53
  • It is just for the sake of my knowledge. There should be a standard protocol. – user13854 May 30 '14 at 1:30
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    Do universities actually reissue diplomas per se, or only proof of degree completion (as the last line on the transcript)? – JeffE May 30 '14 at 2:36
  • @JeffE I know that The Edinburgh University does, but with the new signatures. They also print when it was awarded. – Davidmh May 30 '14 at 9:50
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Will the university reprint the diploma with its original signatures or generate a new diploma with signatures of current university officials?

The policy depends on the university. For example, replacement diplomas from Harvard include the names of the officials who were in office at the time the original diploma was issued, but without signatures, while those from Stanford include the names and signatures of the current officials. Some casual web searching suggests that Stanford's policy is more common, but it's certainly not universal.

However, a diploma does not have issuance date (only the date awarded).

Reissued diplomas are typically marked as such. For example, this is part of both Harvard and Stanford's policies, and web searching suggests it's very widespread.

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