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I am a PhD student from Europe. I was supposed to spend a few months in the US to work on a research project. Due to personal issues (mental health), I decided to come back to Europe after just a few days. The hosting supervisor happily agreed to keep working remotely since nothing would change (i.e., I can work on this paper from anywhere).

Would you still list this position in your CV? If so, how? While the main output would be a scientific article, I see how research stays at other institutions might look good on an academic CV. Also considering that I was awarded two scholarships for this stay, which I would also like to include in the CV.

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    I think it depends on the scientific field. If you are doing lab work in a wet lab as a remote position, that is different if the position is remote. For folks in computer science or applied math, some argue that they don't need to be in person to do the work. In that case, the in person experience is more of a conversation about relationships than the experience of physically using machines, pipettes, etc. The question back to you is what is lost by saying it's remote? Otherwise, I would just declare their location with "(remote position)" next to it and leave it there. Commented Apr 12 at 16:54
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    @yourfriendlyresearchadmin I do not do wet lab work, just analyze data and do some math. And yes I can definitely add “remote”. Thank you
    – wrong_path
    Commented Apr 12 at 18:30

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You got all formalities aligned to spend a few months in the US and you were accepted.

So in all aspects you were formally a visiting student at the US institution. Surely, you were physically not there, but you were mentally there, it belongs therefore in your CV, you even built some connection with the supervisor there.

At the very minimum, your CV shows you can obtain a visa for the US, which is not completely obvious.

What you miss is what I count for the indirect importance of being a visiting scholar, i.e. the physical change of setting, the physical encounters with other colleageus even from other fields ... but these things do appear in the CV only when they are fruitful (for example because you published a paper with other researchers, or because by networking you managed to get another visting position).

By the way, your CV is yours and it is what you make out of it: visiting Stanford from an unknwon university for two months may open a lot of non-scientific doors with people that do not understand anything about science, but it will not impress nobody in science communities unless you publish something peer-reviewed with an expert from Stanford may help you (if the expert is a real expert ...). And if you did not publish anything, you may still have learned plenty of things, even if you cannot exactly formalize and crystallize in your CV...

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  • Thank you for the feedback. I agree. As I wrote, I also got two scholarships to go there... And with this professor I'll write 1 first-author paper for my PhD, plus she asked me to get involved in another one too.
    – wrong_path
    Commented Apr 9 at 8:08
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Is there a reason why you would not include this experience in your CV? I posit that the benefits of this experience far outweigh the risks/cons. It also makes for - what I believe to be - interesting conversation(s). This is entirely your call, but since you did put in the work, and considering all the benefits associated with (strong) international experiences/connections, why shouldn’t it be reflected (somewhere) in your CV?

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    "Is there a reason why you would not include this experience in your CV?" - OP is probably concerned about being accused of or seen as misleading people by claiming a few months visiting position while they actually were only physically present for days.
    – Bryan Krause
    Commented Apr 15 at 15:26
  • @BryanKrause Exactly. This is my main concern.
    – wrong_path
    Commented Apr 16 at 7:26
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    The OP completed the position virtually, and regardless of the circumstances that led to the change, that work did still occur. Commented Apr 16 at 16:06
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First of all, I hope you're getting better already... Mental health is really important and it's great to hear you had the courage to do what was best for you! (I think many in your situation would have opted for staying because of the pressure, which just contributes to the health spiral) Like EarlGrey, I think what counts most is that you managed to formally get the position with all the requirements! Certainly, it is not the same not having physically spent time at the institution but in the article I suppose you would make your institutional affiliation with the visited institution and thank the funders of your stay, right?

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The main thing is that you are working on the project and you were employed in the US university. I don't see why you should not put it on your CV. I would put it with the title you were officially assigned with.

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