3

For example, I have an appendix X, in which I wrote:

Looking on different websites, a list of models of X was compiled for Y purpose. These websites are:
\begin{description}[noitemsep]
  \item \url{https:.....}
  \item \url{https:.....}
  \item \url{https:.....}
  \item \url{https:.....}
\end{description}

To clarify, models of X often have a short lifespan.
To determine if they are obsolete or not, the following websites were used: \url{https:.....} and \url{https:....}.

Is it okay to put the links like that, or should I make a reference in the bibliography for each link? How is the right format? For instance:

Looking on different websites, a list of models of X was compiled for Y purpose. These websites are [1], [2], [3], and [4].

To clarify, models of X often have a short lifespan.
To determine if they are obsolete or not, the following websites were used: [x] and [y].

In the bibliography:

[1] Website 1 URL

[2] Website 2 URL

[3] Website 3 URL

[4] Website 4 URL

[x] Website X URL

[y] Website Y URL

I've been considering the idea of naming the title of the website and adding a citation to it, something along these lines:

Appendix:

"...the following websites were utilized: "Title or Name of the Website" [x]. and "Title or Name of the second Website" [y].

Bibliography:

[x] [Title] Available at: www.example.com

I am thinking about removing the list of websites and leave only two links.

5
  • 2
    How long are these URLs? Are they super ugly? Mar 18 at 17:27
  • 2
    what style guide does your school use? Mar 18 at 17:34
  • @AzorAhai-him- the longest one is: gr-satellites.readthedocs.io/en/latest/…
    – ed190
    Mar 18 at 17:55
  • 1
    @RichardErickson They only said: "According to the examination regulations, there are no specifications regarding the formatting/design of the thesis. In case of doubt, please refer to DIN 5008"
    – ed190
    Mar 18 at 17:57
  • 1
    @O.R.Mapper I think so
    – ed190
    Mar 18 at 19:43

2 Answers 2

3

In lieu of any formatting prescriptions, remember that citations serve two purposes: to provide proper intellectual credit and for the use and convenience of your reader.

A format that makes your thesis hard to read is bad.

In my opinion, a list of websites used for data are distinct from other intellectual citations, so I think they would be most useful compiled and listed separately from your other references/bibliography. If they are in an appendix and you clearly refer to the appendix when it's appropriate to do so, that seems like it would be easily digestible to a reader. They only need to seek your appendix if the list of websites is important to them, and if the list of websites is important to them then they are organized in one clear place. You should also make clear to your reader how these particular websites were chosen, as well as all the information necessary to contextualize your use of those websites, like the date accessed.

2

While it is a bit hard to understand what you want, I think the essential thing is that each URL should be listed with the date at which you accessed it last ("...often have a short lifespan...").

This should always be done with any volatile resource or one associated with a given date/time.

Alternatively use a link archived at the Wayback Machine.

1
  • Yes, if they are transient sources, or might be, part of the biblio entry should be "downloaded on <date>", or similar. Mar 18 at 19:05

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