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I'm from the Middle East, and I'm pursuing my bachelor's degree in Physics. I am looking for scholarship opportunities in the U.S., but I'm concerned about my GPA. I anticipate graduating with a GPA between 3.4 and 3.5 out of 4 for the next year. The challenge is that I had to retake around 8 courses to improve my GPA, while there are F grades in three of them. If I maintain my GPA between 3.4 to 3.5 range, can I still get a scholarship in the US?

If you're wondering why this happened, I faced financial problems that compelled me to work for a year. Additionally, during my first year at university, my mom passed away due to cancer, which had a significant impact on my mental well-being. To add to the difficulties, my dad passed away four years before her, I'm sharing these personal challenges to inquire whether it's still possible for me to secure a scholarship. I'm also curious to know if these circumstances are something I should explain in my scholarship applications or university admissions processes.

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    Note that "scholarships" for grad study in US are rare. I'd guess especially rare for foreign students. Most students are funded as Teaching Assistants or Research Assistants, mostly TAs. That requires English skills. But if you can get accepted for graduate study a TA or RA is pretty likely. And grades in upper level physics courses, and maybe math, will be more important than the overall GPA. But to find out if you are eligible you need to apply.
    – Buffy
    Jan 20 at 14:09
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    And, I guess I don't understand the "off topic" close votes. It is probably a duplicate of several others, however. See: academia.stackexchange.com/q/38237/75368 and academia.stackexchange.com/q/176908/75368
    – Buffy
    Jan 20 at 14:12
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    Yes, there are almost NO full scholarships.
    – Buffy
    Jan 20 at 19:38
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    @Buffy I am aware that several students in the Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia understand RA/TA or Fellowships as scholarships and they often don't understand the distinction until they arrive in the US. That is how I inferred scholarship as RA/TA in this question. Also, several students in that region understand post-doc as a formal degree awarding education level after Ph.D. which is not true--post-doc is an actual job just like any other job and students learn that after coming to the US. I hope this helps you to clarify things. Jan 20 at 20:24
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    @Fadi Scholarships where you "just study" are almost unheard of. You work, and in partial payment for the work you get the fees and tuition covered. The other part of the payment for the work gets paid to you in "cash" so that you can cover basic living expenses. The word "scholarship" isn't really used to mean "any and all funding for study", rather the kind of funding where you're not paid for doing a job, but just to study. GPA may play some role, but I doubt it will have impact on its own. If you're otherwise a well qualified candidate, I wouldn't worry too much about GPA. Jan 20 at 20:43

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Your specific case depends upon which university you apply to and the level of competition in the season you applied. The US has several universities with diverse requirements and accepts students from a wide range of backgrounds and achievements. So, you have a wide range of options. Also, GPA is only one part of your application packet. Other items in application packets such as GRE, TOEFL/IELTS (if needed), statement of purpose, publications, CV, research experiences, research interest match with potential future advisor, university and department reputation, competition among universities for students, number of applications received in the given season and several other factors affects your admission and availability of funding (GRA/GTA/Fellowships). I would recommend focusing on other components of the application packet as well while putting in your best effort to get the best GPA you can. Also, a 3.4-3.5 out of 4 GPA is not a bad GPA.

You may write about your hardship in the cover letter and SOP so your admission committee will know about your hardship and the reason behind a few Cs. But it may not necessarily hamper your chance. I have Cs in my undergrad and still managed to have a doctorate--not in physics though. Good luck with your future aspirations.

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    thanks alot for your motivation i'll be working for that ...
    – Scientist
    Jan 20 at 12:35

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