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I have received an offer for a lecturer position at a UK-based institution. Upon researching the visa application process, it appears that there is no differentiation between EU and non-EU citizens. However, some colleagues and friends currently residing in the UK have mentioned that EU citizens may not need to pay additional insurance surcharges. As a German citizen, I am curious to confirm if this information is still accurate, or if it pertained to a time when the UK was an EU member. Any clarification on this matter would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance for your assistance.

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    This gov.uk page may be relevant: gov.uk/guidance/…
    – B.Liu
    Sep 5, 2023 at 22:34
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    My understanding is that only if you fall under the EU Settlement Scheme (essentially, you must have been living in the UK since before the end of 2020 to qualify, with some exceptions) you would not need a visa and the corresponding health surcharge. But this question is probably more suitable for the Expatriates StackExchange site. Sep 6, 2023 at 11:03
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    This follow-up to your earlier question, might get better responses from the SE: expatriate site. Post Brexit, I think the best you can get is an IHS refund if you are S1 holder. Sep 6, 2023 at 13:05
  • @semmyk-research what do you mean by S1 holder? Please clarify.
    – Funk
    Sep 7, 2023 at 14:18
  • [RE: S1 holder] .... S1 (formerly E 106, E 109 and E 121) as I understand it, is a certificate of entitlement to healthcare if an EU citizen doesn't live in the country where their health insurance was insured. See UK Gov guidance for IHS refund Sep 8, 2023 at 17:25

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