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I have the following paragraph:

This incident was part of a proxy war between the United States and the Soviet Union, known as the Cold War. These two nations had different ideologies. The United States was a Capitalist country, where people had to compete for money if they are residents in it. This creates a gap between the net worths of people in the United States. The Soviet Union, on the other hand, was a Communist country, where people in it had to share their profits with everyone. Theoretically, this makes all people in a communist country have the same amount of money. Another difference between the two nations was that the United States was a democratic nation. The Soviet Union was authoritarian, although it claimed to be democratic.

which all comes from here. Is it possible to cite the entire paragraph using one in-text citation in APA format? I don't want to do this for each sentence, so I am looking for a more concise way.

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I'm assuming this is for a school paper. You're probably best asking your professor and seeing what they want.

As far as I know, there is no maximum amount of information you can cite at once. If a block of factual information came from the same source, you could add a single citation. I believe APA states that it should be after the first sentence. I have also seen the citation at the end. That is how I have always done it when 2 or 3 sentences were based on one source. It is cumbersome to add a citation after every sentence. For example:

The sun is a yellow dwarf star with a circumference of 4,379,000km [1]. Temperatures on the surface range from 5,973°C to 15,000,000°C [1]. It is primarily composed of hydrogen gas that is fused into helium during nuclear reactions [1].

versus

The sun is a yellow dwarf star with a circumference of 4,379,000km [1]. Temperatures on the surface range from 5,973°C to 15,000,000°C. It is primarily composed of hydrogen gas that is fused into helium during nuclear reactions.

As long as the source of the information remains unchanged, the second example is acceptable and cleaner to read. Now there is a bit of a hitch here. If you are editorializing i.e., adding your own opinion between cited facts, or you are adding information from a second source, you must make it clear where each chunk of information comes from. For example:

The sun is a yellow dwarf star with a circumference of 4,379,000km [1]. Yellow dwarf stars are the most interesting type of star. And our sun is the perfect size. Temperatures on the surface range from 5,973°C to 15,000,000°C [1]. It is primarily composed of hydrogen gas that is fused into helium during nuclear reactions.

I've added a couple extra sentences that are not necessary derived from my imaginary source and so I have added another copy of the original citation, to indicate when we are getting back into factual territory.

This example is a bit awkward, but I think it illustrates that you want to clearly cite all material derived from the source and only material from the source.

I hope this helps! In your case, I would probably just add a single citation after the first sentence per APA guidelines

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