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When directly quoting from a footnote, I have sometimes seen authors indicate this by including something along the lines of "n", "fn.", "footnote 2", etc. in their citations, like "(Jones, 2023, p. 160n)" or some such. Is there any standard way of doing this in APA? Also, is there any particular convention for when I want to point to both the body of a particular page, and a particular footnote on that page? For example, if I want to point towards both p. 160 of Jones, 2023, as well as a footnote on that same page, can I say something like "Certain comments in her 2023 (p. 160 and n) make it clear that Jones..."?

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This is partly addressed in the APA Style blog post How to Cite Part of a Work. The example given for a parenthetical in-text citation referencing a footnote is

(Park, Van Bavel, Vasey, & Thayer, 2013, footnote 3)

The page claims that the word 'footnote' should be in lowercase, however that might not be universal as the presumably more recent basic principles page gives as an example

(Garcia et al., 2020, Footnote 2)


Also, is there any particular convention for when I want to point to both the body of a particular page, and a particular footnote on that page?

It is unclear to me why you would need to cite both in that case. Since the page contains the footnote it would seem enough to cite just the page. (Perhaps it's worthwhile if the footnote continues on the next page?) But based on the comments to the blog post I think you can use

(Jones, 2023, p. 160 and footnote 4)

Note that this is different from

(Jones, 2023, footnote 4, p. 160)

which is interpreted as a reference to footnote 4 on page 160. I would tend to avoid using "n" or "fn." in most contexts, as spelling out "footnote" is more clear.

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  • Thank you! I guess I wanted to cite both the footnote and the page because there are two relevant points, one in the body and one in a footnote, and if the reader looked to the source to see what I'm referring to, they may just see the relevant part of the body and think that's all I'm referring to and not consider the footnote too. (I feel like that's what I'd do if I were such a reader... but maybe that's just me.)
    – Spailpín
    Apr 8, 2023 at 8:57

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