10

I have been a retired Emeritus Professor for 10 years. Thus I have no university email address anymore; I only have my personal email address. Google Scholar has pages and pages of my articles listed, and I am trying to verify my personal email address (the only one I use now) on my profile page. Unfortunately, only institutional email addresses are accepted there.

Question: How can I verify my personal (non-institutional) email address on my profile page on Google Scholar?

5
  • Related question that's been the duplicate target for a similar question: Alternatives for when your institution doesn't provide you an e-mail address
    – Anyon
    Mar 21, 2023 at 22:26
  • 6
    I thought a university email address was one of the standard perks of emeritus status. Not at your institution, it seems, or have you checked? Mar 22, 2023 at 0:07
  • 5
    Since you are an emeritus, you should ask the current chair of your former department to reinstate your old email address: Having an institutional email address is a usual curtesy extended to emeriti. Mar 22, 2023 at 0:08
  • Colleges have these no email policies for various reasons, often because of things like the connection of email to various systems. Do you have a web page? What I think you could try is put in your personal email, then when it is rejected see if they have a procedure for people in your situation.
    – Elin
    Mar 22, 2023 at 3:04
  • 1
    As you also note, Google Scholar requires an institutional email for verification and inclusion of the profile in search results. While this is unfortunate, the answer clearly seems to be (from the official source) that this is not possible.
    – GoodDeeds
    Mar 22, 2023 at 6:46

2 Answers 2

5

To convert my comment to a proper answer:

Since you are a (professor) emeritus, you should ask the current chair of your former department to reinstate your old email address: Having an institutional email address is a usual curtesy extended to all emeriti.

Personally, I never heard of the situation at a US university where an emeritus would not be allowed to keep a university email address. Providing emeriti with institutional email addresses is a common practice at my university and at two other places I randomly checked (Ohio State and Princeton).

For (some degree of) confirmation that it is a common practice in general, see the accepted answer here. (Even though the linked question was closed since "the answer to this question strongly depends on individual factors," no actual examples of denial of email addresses to emeriti were given.)

If a departmental Chair cannot figure out how to proceed with such a request (or declines the request), then escalate the request to Dean's office.

5
  • I have seen more than once private email addresses as means of contact in the foreword of books by emeriti (Germany, law). I don't know if they really don't have an institutional email address or only don't use it. At my university you can keep your email address even as a (former) student, if you join the alumni association.
    – K-HB
    Mar 24, 2023 at 16:17
  • @K-HB: My area is math: I never (in over 30 years of doing research) saw an email address (public or private) of an author listed in a book (articles are different!) published by a reputable publisher (say, Springer-Verlag in German context). But maybe it is field-dependent. That said, I would be interested in hearing of a single example where an institutional email address were denied to an emeritus. Mar 24, 2023 at 16:24
  • @Moishe Kohan: "I never (in over 30 years of doing research) saw an email address (public or private) of an author listed in a book" -- I've seen email addresses on several occasions in prefaces of math textbooks, where the author(s) ask readers to write them about errata, errors, and the like. Probably this was more in the 1990s and first decade of the 2000s than the past 10 years. As for email addresses in the copyright-info page, after looking through about 20 somewhat recently published math books on my shelves (out of curiosity), I found these non-preface examples: (continued) Mar 24, 2023 at 19:03
  • Moschovakis 2006 and Benedetto/Czaja 2009 and Edgar 2008 and Bukovský 2011 and Dasgupta 2014. For each of these you can see the email addresses, using amazon.com's "Look Inside" capability, on the page immediately after the title page. Mar 24, 2023 at 19:03
  • @DaveLRenfro: You are right! I guess, I simply did not pay attention. Mar 24, 2023 at 20:20
1

Google Scholar only allows you to verify corporate email addresses. As a retired professor emeritus without an institutional email address, you will not be able to verify your personal email address on your profile page.

But you can try

  1. Make sure your posts are correctly listed on your profile page. (can be added manually or with ORCID)

  2. You can add a link to your personal website or academia.edu profile on your Google Scholar profile page. (will help establish your authorship and make it easier for other users to find your work)

you can also contact Google Scholar support and explain your situation.

Here is a link to a similar discussion. Alternatives for when your institution doesn't provide you an e-mail address

Maybe you will find useful information about technological solutions

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .