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It is common for PhD students (at least in Europe) to spend some months in a different institution. Can this be later included on CV as visiting scholar?

It seems the definition varies depending on the University.

Harvard considers professors as visiting scholars and the others as visiting researchers.

UChicago considers professors as VISITING PROFESSORS and the others as visiting scholars.

Wikipedia says that a visiting scholar is a "scholar (fine, but what is the definition of SCHOLAR?) that is visiting a different institution.

How do people put this on CV usually?

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    Since it is so common, why would it be advantageous to spend the space on a CV for that?
    – Jon Custer
    Mar 3, 2023 at 4:30
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    @JonCuster (devils' advocate role here) It is commno, but it is still a learning experience . Follolwing your logic, why would it be advantageos to spend some lines describing your PhD on your cv?
    – EarlGrey
    Mar 3, 2023 at 13:40
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    @EarlGrey - one includes what would be relevant to the job you are applying for with the CV. What one actually did at the other campus, not what you were called (or called yourself) is the important bit. "Collaborated with Group A to demonstrate a novel underwater basket weaving pattern that yields higher basket strengths" is useful information. "I was a visiting scholar extraordinaire at the University of Big Name" is not.
    – Jon Custer
    Mar 3, 2023 at 15:25
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    AFAIU, a 'visiting scholar' would be expected to teach rather than act as a student. Mar 4, 2023 at 3:09
  • @JonCuster ok, in this I agree, I think OP have issues with how to introduce what you described, rather than boasting "big role in big uni".
    – EarlGrey
    Mar 6, 2023 at 14:53

2 Answers 2

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It isn't proper in academia to make up titles that weren't awarded. If you work at a place and they give you a title then you can use it. In general, titles are awarded by others, not assumed by individuals. You aren't a knight unless the Queen (or King) makes you so.

But a line in a CV to describe your role is fine if it won't be assumed to be a title. Sadly "visiting scholar" or, especially, "Visiting Scholar" does sound like a conferred title. Saying you spent a year studying and researching at institution X has a different sense. But if X gives you that title you can use it.

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At least in my field (Europe, Physics), what you're describing would be listed as "Visiting Student" on a CV. The only exception I can think of is if you won some notable position/title/fellowship for the stay that comes with its own name (like @Buffy said).

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