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From AIP's Web Posting Guidelines for Journal Authors:

For noncommercial free-access preprint servers (e.g., arXiv)

  • You may post the preprint prior to submission and/or acceptance, using the credit line formatting below
  • You may post the accepted manuscript immediately after acceptance, using the credit line formatting below
  • You may update with the VOR 12 months after publication, with the credit line and a link to the VOR on AIP Publishing’s site

and

Format for credit lines

  • After publication please use: “This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and AIP Publishing. This article appeared in (citation of published article) and may be found at (URL/link for published article abstract).
  • Prior to publication please use: “The following article has been submitted to/accepted by [Name of Journal]. After it is published, it will be found at Link.”
  • For Creative Commons licensed material, please use: “Copyright (year) Author(s). This article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) License.”

Perhaps it's just me, but the second bullet in the "Format for credit lines" section doesn't seem clear; there's sort-of an infinite half-space of time "prior to publication", where several things can happen.

Assuming I've posted in arXiv first, does AIP say I need to add "submitted to [Name of Journal]" upon submission, then change it again to "accepted by [Name of Journal]" assuming that happens? And if it's ultimately rejected, must I then add a "rejected by" or just repost with any mention of submission removed?

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In my non-lawyer's opinion, these clauses are silly.

Their "format for credit lines" do not substitute for the license the work is released under. Any of the licenses you choose to post on arXiv for are more permissive than that clause, and that clause has no weight over someone using the version of your paper posted on arXiv. It's silly.

Prior to publication please use: “The following article has been submitted to/accepted by [Name of Journal]. After it is published, it will be found at Link.”

This is even sillier - a preprint doesn't belong to anyone but the authors. The clause "after it is published, it will be found at..." would only possibly apply once the article is actually accepted. Are they implying that they accept all work that is submitted? That's not a mark of a reputable journal. I don't feel like a reputable journal should ever want this statement on a submitted article, as any submitted articles deemed not suitable will not and should not ever be found at "Link". A submitted article could be some crank perpetual motion paper, or, worse, some screed against a particular ethnicity.

The part that doesn't seem as silly is this part:

For Creative Commons licensed material, please use: “Copyright (year) Author(s). This article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) License.”

The "For Creative Commons licensed material" implies to me that they're perfectly fine with you releasing your stuff with a CC-BY license, and no other add-on restrictions are going to fly if you've already labeled your work with a CC-BY license, so if you're using CC-BY it seems like you can just ignore that. Personally, I'd probably choose not to use this publisher based on the level of silliness, but if I was then I'd assume that the other silliness only applies if you didn't use a CC-BY license and just comply with this one clause. Giving them the benefit of the doubt, maybe they really only meant for those other statements to apply if you choose to submit a preprint without a CC-BY license.

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  • Interesting and illuminating, especially never having been a submitting author before and no experience submitting to arXiv. It seems I need to do some reading on the arXiv license options now.
    – uhoh
    Feb 22, 2023 at 1:51
  • Note that use of a CC-BY license will likely mean that you also have to select an open access option for publishing in the journal, which usually comes with a fee.
    – TimRias
    Feb 22, 2023 at 14:47

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