2

I was recently awarded a MSCA postdoctoral fellowship to conduct research at the university of Copenhagen in Denmark, and I am now trying to figure out the taxes on the fellowship. It boils down to a couple of questions:

  • In some countries (like my home country of Belgium), no income tax is paid on the mobility and family allowances. Is it similar in Denmark or are both allowances added to the salary and then taxed?
  • I've been going through blog posts and some claim that their employer withholds some of the basic salary as overhead, even before income tax is calculated, effectively reducing the amount that is stated in the MSCA guidelines. I cannot seem to find anything on the website of the university of Copenhagen whether or not this is the case.

In short, I cannot find specific information for the calculation of taxes on the different allowances (salary, mobility, family) in Denmark. Is there some information out there?

1
  • Contact the university! Feb 15, 2023 at 20:20

1 Answer 1

1

Probably the best thing to do is to contact the university. They will be able to give you a good estimate on how much of the fellowship will end up in your bank account. You are not the first MSCA fellow to start at the university. I've found the International Staff Mobility unit at UCPH very useful in general matters involving moving and starting work in Denmark.

Note that:

I've been going through blog posts and some claim that their employer withholds some of the basic salary as overhead, even before income tax is calculated, effectively reducing the amount that is stated in the MSCA guidelines.

It is explicitly not allowed to pay overhead from the salary part of grant. However, note that total salary costs is typically more than the gross salary, as this will also include things like employer contributions to pensions, social security, health care, etc. Depending on the country this can be a significant percentage of the total salary costs. I do not know exactly how much this is in Denmark.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .