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I have a parenthetical serial list of citations that demonstrate support for a claim I make prior to the parenthetical list.

X has been shown to impact Y (e.g., Mo 1900, Larry 1920, Curly 1950).

I additionally want to point out an additional citation that -- although it doesn't directly show X impacts Y -- demonstrates how the impacts of one of these citations (e.g., Curly 1950) can have broader but relevant effect.

X has been shown to impact Y (e.g., Mo 1900, Larry 1920, Curly 1950). The results of Curly (1950) may result in Z (Shemp 2000).

However, I'd like a way to say this more concisely. Is there some form of shorthand or sentence/citation structure commonly used in manuscript writing that would allow me to combine the Shemp citation with the rest of the list?

Ideally, something concise akin to the Latin cf., would be ideal, though multiple words would suffice if appropriate. Something that would fill in the blank below:

X has been shown to impact Y (e.g., Mo 1900, Larry 1920, Curly 1950, _____ Shemp 2000).

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  • perhaps something that means "and see related" but in a way that I can associate Shemp with the effects of Curly more specifically/explicitly. Jan 27 at 0:18

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M, L, C; see also S

M, L, C; for consequences of C see also S

M, L, C; the last of these also leads to S

But "Curly 1950" is already concise, so if you want to convey all your information you can't make it much more concise than in your version.

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