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I am interviewing at several research institutions in the U.S. for a tenure-track faculty position all around the same time. I booked a multi-city flight to avoid having to fly back to my current hometown between each interview because that would be lame. I plan on asking the institutions for guidance on how to get reimbursed, but figured I would ask here about what I should expect or what is commonly done for this situation. As an example, say for three interviews, ideally each institution would pay a third of the cost, but each institution has its own rules and they are not bound to do what other institutions would in any case.

So, how do U.S. research institutions typically reimburse a faculty candidate's airfare costs for multi-city trips?

Related: How to buy plane tickets for job interviews?

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    have you asked them ? – Suresh Apr 4 '14 at 4:24
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    @Suresh The answer to your question has already been given. I just want to know what to expect. – Mad Jack Apr 4 '14 at 12:55
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    I've usually found that places are happy to pay an appropriate fraction of the cost, but as you say, it probably depends on the institution's policies and there might not be a general answer. – Matt Reece Apr 4 '14 at 13:02
  • @MattReece Thanks. I'm also curious if folks have any examples of difficulties they've encountered when attempting to get reimbursed for multi-city trips. – Mad Jack Apr 4 '14 at 13:55
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When looking for a postdoc and visiting multiple labs, I was asked to split the reimbursement for travel costs between the institutions. The exact details of how to split were left to me.

Most institutions expect to fund the entire trip for faculty candidates, so I don't foresee any problems with you asking them to pay less than what they expected.

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I once visited an institution where they asked me to get an itemized receipt from the airline that broke down the fare by leg. (This information wasn't on my original ticket so I had to ask the ticket agent at the airport.) They then reimbursed me for only the legs going to and from their institution.

Of course, when multiple institutions are involved, you will still have to split intermediate legs somehow.

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