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I have seen many authors cite in scientific research papers as follows:

First_author's_last_name et al.[10] Another_first_author's_last_name et al. [15]

I have also seen some papers refer to popular methods created by some authors as follows:

In 2006, CravingGold [10] was created by some students from Havard under the tutelage of ...

Here, CravingGold is a famous method everyone in that domain is aware of.

What is the correct way of citation if I want to use et al. and also mention the popular method the authors created? For example,

First_author's_last_name et al. [10] proposed a method based on hyperplane called CravingGold

or do I say:

First_author's_last_name et al. proposed a method based on hyperplane called CravingGold [10]

or is it correct to even say:

First_author's_last_name et al. [10] proposed a method based on hyperplane called CravingGold [10]

2 Answers 2

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Either of your first two options would be fine. I personally prefer to put the citation immediately after the authors' names as in your first option, but I have seen both and neither is uncommon.

If I saw something like the third option I would assume the double citation was unintentional. You're only mentioning it once so it should only be cited once.

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You can find the IEEE style guide at

https://www.ieee.org/content/dam/ieee-org/ieee/web/org/conferences/style_references_manual.pdf

Under Referencing, it says:

NOTE: Use et al. when three or more names are given.

In the examples given, there are no first names. It also says that you should treat references as footnotes or nouns.

Adding first names can be useful, since some places have only very few last name. I personally hate it if references are given by number only as it forces me to reread the Reference section.

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