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My paper is recently published in an open access journal (4 days ago). One day after publishing I spotted a small mistake in a formula. Although it is a small mitake I am worried that it might affect citations to my paper. In the day I noticed the mistake, I sent an email to the production group and they told me that they have forwarded my request to the editor. Since then, no one has contacted me from the journal.

My question is that is there any chance they will agree to my request? If so, will they make this correction in both online and printed versions of my article? I would not care if it was just a typo. But unfortunately it is in a formula.

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  • Only they can say. They might also be able to publish an erratum separately, or you might be able to do so separately if you have a web page on which to do so.
    – Buffy
    Sep 12, 2022 at 12:32
  • Thanks @Buffy. I know that pubishing an erratum is the last solution. But I do not prefer it since publishing an erratum is itself a source of confusion for the readers.
    – m.taheri
    Sep 12, 2022 at 12:38

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It is possible only if the journal makes it possible. They likely hold copyright now. Their policies will rule the day. Since it is soon after publication it may be more likely, and you can ask, but their own processes and procedures may not make it possible.

While you may not "prefer" an erratum, it may be your only option and is probably preferable to just letting it go. You don't really want the first citations to be ones that point out the error.

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  • They told me that the editor has approved the corrections. Does it mean that they have agreed to apply the correction in the main text? if so, will the correction also take place in all the websites (like PubMed) that index journal?
    – m.taheri
    Sep 15, 2022 at 16:28
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    Maybe. Ask if you need to be sure.
    – Buffy
    Sep 15, 2022 at 16:32

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