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I'm currently unaffiliated (but soon will be). I'm submitting a manuscript at the Journal of Multivariate Analysis (JMVA), and it shows me these two options:

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I think the first option is out of the question, as I'll have to pay for it, so I'm thinking of choosing the second one. Am I right in doing so?

Also, I've never seen this paying option before for paper submission, why am I seeing it here?

Thanks in advance!

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    There are descriptions for both options in the screenshots. Is there something you want to know that's not described there?
    – Allure
    Jul 28, 2022 at 1:34
  • @Allure Thanks - I didn't understand whether I'd be able to post the paper on ArXiV or ResearchGate or Google Scholar. They're non-commercial, so is the answer a yes? TIA! Aug 10, 2022 at 11:12
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    Are you sure it's a non-commercial journal? To find out their sharing policies as well you'd have to check the website. In this case the journal is published by Elsevier, and Elsevier's sharing policies are here: elsevier.com/about/policies/sharing. So the answer is yes, you can put your preprint on the arXiv.
    – Allure
    Aug 10, 2022 at 12:02

2 Answers 2

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If you google "Gold Open Access" or ask Wikipedia, you will see what it means. Basically the author (or their grant) pays for the article, rather than subscribers.

For an individual without support it is, as you've guessed, not a viable option. But for well funded research groups it is something to consider. The subscription model means that the publisher absorbs a bit of risk that subscriptions will be sufficient to cover the cost and profit of publishing.

There may still be some fees to publish (page charges), so it isn't always entirely free to authors, but some journals will waive such fees for those without funds to cover them, including individuals. It is something to explore if you are asked to pay.

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Also, I've never seen this paying option before for paper submission, why am I seeing it here?

I don't see good reasons to ask this question before peer review. Actually, to me it seems like a red flag, because it suggests that the editorial decision may depend on whether you are paying those two grand or not.

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  • Note that some OA publishers also use a form of open peer review. In that case, they may need to know prior to review. It is one of the controversies around OA, actually. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_peer_review
    – Buffy
    Jul 28, 2022 at 13:51
  • @Buffy I believe you are referring to journals in which peer review happens after publication, and hence all submissions are accepted and the publication fee is due before peer review; is that correct? I did not consider that setup, as the wording in those screenshots made it clear that it is not the case here. Jul 28, 2022 at 14:08
  • I don't know the actual situation. There seem to be a lot of options. But payments should only be "due" after it is clear that the article will be published, no matter the complications of the system.
    – Buffy
    Jul 28, 2022 at 14:17
  • @Buffy not true for all journals. Jul 28, 2022 at 14:50
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    Hmmm. Guess I've been living in a sheltered world. They claim, at least, that it doesn't go toward profits (claim!!).
    – Buffy
    Jul 28, 2022 at 15:01

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