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For example, if I want to write the sentence like this:

Although researchers have proved [first thing](name1, XY), [second thing] is also confirmed effective (name2, XY).

Both the first and second thing belongs to the "although" sentence. I do not want them into two separate sentences.

So can I cite in-text like this? I need to follow the APA7.

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    Who would stop you? Are you following a specific style guide? If you've seen this done, why do you think you'd be prevented from doing it?
    – Bryan Krause
    May 24 at 16:49
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    Please clarify your specific problem or provide additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it's hard to tell exactly what you're asking.
    – Community Bot
    May 24 at 17:01
  • I need to follow the APA7. And my question is all about if the in-text citation like this is acceptable. Because I have never seen the intext citation like this, they are always at the end of a full-sentence like ……(Name,XY). or Name(XY)…… . So I don't know if I could put two citations in a complete sentence consisting of two sentences.
    – Mona YEE
    May 25 at 2:54
  • What APA 7 references/resources have you consulted so far?
    – shoover
    May 25 at 16:10

1 Answer 1

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There is no problem other than style and readability. I suggest you try a couple of different ways of saying what you want to say and make a decision.

This is one situation where citations in footnotes has a readability advantage since they disrupt the flow less.

It is also possible that a reviewer will make a suggestion about it no matter what you do. But write it the way you think it should be done.

Note that ending the sentence at the comma and then starting a new sentence with "Furthermore..." is probably just about equivalent to what you want to say.

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  • Thank you for your help.
    – Mona YEE
    May 25 at 2:44

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