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So I graduated with a master's degree 5 years ago. Back then my priorities were different and I didn't opt for the thesis option. I kind of regret not doing a thesis.

Is it possible to apply to the master's program only for the thesis option? And use the grades from the master's program for the coursework component of the program?

I want to get a feel of what it's like to do research in an academic setting. If I like it, I might consider applying to Ph.D. programs after this.

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    What country? If you can get into a PhD program, that is probably better for you financially. They should pay you. Commented May 21, 2022 at 0:31
  • I am currently living in the US. But I don't mind doing this from another country too. The problem with applying to PhD programs is that my grades are not that great, I don't have any research experience. I am not even sure if I will like it if I enroll in the program.
    – Aditya
    Commented May 21, 2022 at 0:32
  • Writing a masters thesis will not fix your grades. You can start a PhD and then quit if you don't like it. Commented May 21, 2022 at 0:35
  • Research experience is not necessarily required to start a PhD in the US. Commented May 21, 2022 at 0:36
  • related, possible duplicate: Can a masters student apply for a second masters in the same field at another university?
    – cag51
    Commented May 21, 2022 at 3:46

1 Answer 1

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Is it possible to apply to the master's program only for the thesis option? And use the grades from the master's program for the coursework component of the program?

The short answer is no. I would find it pretty unlikely the same program will let you back in just to do a thesis. You would be taking up a spot for someone who doesn't already have a master's in that field.

Another university will not admit someone who already has a master's to do another master's in the same field. Perhaps if you found something similar you could convince a program to take you.

However, people are suggesting in the comments you do a PhD because in the US, science PhDs are funded, which means they pay you (a tiny amount) instead of you paying tuition and then also having to work a job to survive (or taking out loans). It is common for programs to also grant you a master's partway through, mine does it at the end of your second year. In other places, this is only possible if you drop out.

So instead of paying for another master's, a PhD program is the next step, with the option to drop out if you don't like research with a master's. Although they may still not give you one if you already have the "same" master's.

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