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Let's take this sample page from Microsoft Docs. It lists multiple contributors (linked below the heading), some from the community with nicknames, as the pages can be edited by practically everyone by submitting a pull request.

Previously, I've tried to identify the “main” author (as in, the person who initially created the page), and using “and others” for the remaining contributors, for example:

@Online{Doe2021,
  author  = {Doe, John and others},
  url = ...,
  urldate = ...,
  (and so on)
}

However, this can be relatively time-consuming and may result in authors, where the real name is not readily identifiable. I wondered if it was enough to use a company author, since the list of authors may already change the next day, and they're not that important to identify a particular web page. This would essentially result in:

@Online{Microsoft2021,
  author  = {{Microsoft}},
  url = ...,
  urldate = ...,
  (and so on)
}

Or is there an even different way, i.e., should I make the effort to identify and list as many authors as possible?

2
  • Microsoft is just fine, Apr 30 at 20:55
  • I had this issue this week, would love to have a "canonical" answer. I have tried, when there is an anchor in the website, to add a link to it (author={https://csci-1301.github.io/about.html#authors}), but it feels weird.
    – Clément
    May 1 at 16:22

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