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The source I would like to cite introduces a new concept, and when doing so, the term used to describe this concept is written in quotation marks – however these quotation marks are used for emphasis rather than citing a specific source.

I.e. The source, written by (Example, 1999) says something like

In the early 20th century, sharp rises in productivity lead to the institution of mass consumption. This mode of production is called "Fordism".

Now, I would like to introduce Fordism in my own writing, and to do so, I would like to cite the first occurrence of the term Fordism, so it is clear to the reader where I got it from.

I.e. I write something along the lines of

This new mode of production, which creates an imperative for mass consumption in order to realize profits from increased productivity, is called "Fordism" (Example, 1999, p.5).

How do I properly use quotation marks in my writing in this example?

Technically, double quotation marks in the original text should be printed as single quotation marks when citing, according to APA guidlines, which would mean I have to print

This new mode of production, which creates an imperative for mass consumption in order to realize profits from increased productivity, is called "'Fordism'" (Example, 1999, p.5).

Which, to me, looks a little awkward. Does anyone know the correct APA-way of handling quotation marks in cases like this?

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    Doesn't APA mean that if the entire section is double-quoted, any interior double-quotes just get changed to single quotes?
    – mkennedy
    Mar 22 at 15:34
  • Yes, that is what APA guidelines state. But I am unsure how this translates to the case above.
    – Pentaquark
    Mar 23 at 10:33
  • Do I understand you correctly @mkennedy, that you would advise to use simple quotation marks?
    – Pentaquark
    Mar 23 at 14:05
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    Only if you're doing this: "In the early 20th century, sharp rises in productivity lead to the institution of mass consumption. This mode of production is called 'Fordism'." If you're indenting or otherwise making clear what the quotation is, but not enclosing it with double quotation marks, leave Fordism in double quotation marks.
    – mkennedy
    Mar 23 at 15:58
  • The issue is, that I am not quoting anything else but the word "Fordism", which is already in quotation marks. So I am neither using quotation marks to indicate a quote in the surrounding words, nor is the passage indented.
    – Pentaquark
    Mar 25 at 12:03

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