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I am planning to submit my paper to a journal. But as I circulate my draft paper to my student peer, one of them ask me why I put my main result in the very first figure. I was silent without any argument.

As far as I know, there are no specific rules against putting the main result in the first figure, but I also could not find a paper that put their main result in the very first figure. Is there any reason why we do not put the main result in the very first figure?

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    Why not? It's the first thing that people look in a paper! Jan 3 at 10:38
  • I think based on the Mr./Mrs. @ouic answer, the paper needs to follow a logical orders so the reader can follow the story of the paper.
    – ani jaya
    Jan 4 at 0:08
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It depends. There are no rules, but you need to make sure that your paper follows a logical order and is easy to understand for the reader. The reader wants to see that any conclusions you draw logically result from the measurements or calculations. This often leads to the main result being presented at the end, but that has never been a requirement or convention.

There is no a-priori reason to not put the main result in the first figure, but there may be underlying problems with the paper, and moving the figure to the end could be (part of) the solution that your peer proposes. Impossible to tell without reading the paper.

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  • Thank you for the answer. It is crystal clear and I absolutely agree.
    – ani jaya
    Jan 4 at 0:10

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