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Taylor & Francis publishes some articles "online first" before they are assigned to a particular issue and page numbers are added. They thus have page numbers starting at 1. I have access to the PDF of such an online first article, which is now properly published in an issue of the journal (and thus has page numbers starting with 601). The length of the article appears to be the same (16 pages). As I don't have access to the published version but need to quote a sentence from p. 14 of the online first pdf, which I have, I was wondering whether I could just calculate the new page numbers (so p. 14 would now be p. 614) or whether the typesetting changes when an article is added to a journal, making this method unreliable when citing.

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    Usually the journal supplies sufficiently definitive page numbers themselves in a "how to cite this paper" linked with the online version. Are you able to find this for the journal in question?
    – jakebeal
    Nov 29 '21 at 11:40
  • @jakebeal the definitive page numbers are those of the now published issue of the journal (so pp. 601-617) - however I do not have access to this issue.
    – SamVimes
    Nov 29 '21 at 11:45
  • @SamVimes if the journal issue's list of contents at the "tandofonline.com " website shows the page range for your paper as being "601-617", then that should be the correct page range.
    – djohn
    Nov 29 '21 at 12:02
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    @djohn Maybe I wasn't clear in my original question, sorry (I will edit it to clarify). I know that the correct page range range is 601-617. The problem is that I only have the pdf of the online first version and want to quote from p. 14 - can I now simply extrapolate that the correct quote would be "quote" (Author 2021, p. 614)
    – SamVimes
    Nov 29 '21 at 12:08
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    @SamVimes based on my personal experience, the typesetting used in the "online first" version should be exactly the same as a final published version (only page numbers change). At the very least, I have yet to see a case where the page layout changed. So I think you should be safe. If it's a very important citation, it might be a good idea to try to get a hold of the final paper, just in case.
    – djohn
    Nov 29 '21 at 12:13
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Note: comment converted into an answer.

Based on my personal experience, the typesetting used in the "online first" version should be exactly the same as a final published version (only page numbers change).

At the very least, I have yet to see a case where the page layout changed. So I think you should be safe. If it's a very important citation, it might nevertheless be a good idea to try to get a hold of the final paper, just in case.

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