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I am a mastering student. I want to pursue PhD and I have already submitted 3 articles to journals. Now I have some results about something. Should I wait until my PhD to publish?

Here is the pros. If my project get completely stuck, I can at least (try to) convince my advisor working on my already finished project, which I already have the results. Also, if unlucky I have no publication in my PhD, I can publish the reserved works to increase my chances to get a postdoc. Also, publish right now does not really increase my chance of getting PhD-It take long time for peer review,and the application deadline are closed. Also if I am correct, the importance of first three publication will make me a "star" already, so I don't have to publish now. Furthermore, unlike research ideas, the result itself won't get better over time.

The cons, of course, is that someone already obtained the same results and published it. And I can't think of any.

So, the question is, what is the cons for my situation? and should I publish it now?

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This depends, at least somewhat, on how "hot" your field is and how likely it is that others are working on the same question(s) or are likely to in the next couple of years. The downside is that you could get scooped if you hold back. Or worse, someone publishes something that actually independently extends what you have done, subsuming it.

In some obscure areas of math and those that aren't being aggressively pursued this is less likely. My own original field was like that.

If you have good results, I'd suggest publishing them, especially if it something that can potentially be pursued and extended later. Again, in math, it is possible to make some changes in definitions (defining new ideas) and developing work in that new context.

It is good to finish your doctorate with a notebook full of problem ideas that you might be able to work on in the future so that you don't need to "start over" from scratch with research problems. And also good to have a good CV so that you get the opportunity to pursue them.

The job market in academia, if that is your goal, is pretty difficult at the moment. Having a deep CV is a big asset.

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