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I've made a new discovery.

It has prompted me to make new hypotheses in multiple areas - not particularly related to each other.

I have already conducted experiments to demonstrate these. I am now organizing all the data for publishing.

My concern is, once I publish the initial discovery, I think readers will immediately ask the same questions which I've already addressed with my other experiments.

I think typically I should NOT include several different types of experiments covering multiple topics, all in a single paper, right?

But I think it would be cool if I can be first to publish on them.

So I dont want to invite competition by excluding them from the initial paper.

If I submit multiple papers (one for each area/experiment) how can I ensure they all get published together?

I'm afraid if some gets rejected and some not, then someone might read my published paper, get the same idea as me, and then beat me to publishing on those other areas.

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    In my area, I've seen many papers that have in their title 'Blah Blah ... : Part x', where 'x' is I, II, ... They are submitted and published together. Of course, rejected together as well. Oct 21, 2021 at 21:59
  • There are many ways to organize the submission. From your question it seems that the papers can't even go to the same journal. Go with some of them out simultaneously. Unless all is trivial you have at least a couple of rounds (submissions / revision) of advantage Congratulations.
    – Alchimista
    Oct 22, 2021 at 11:35

2 Answers 2

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If I submit multiple papers (one for each area/experiment) how can I ensure they all get published together?

You cannot "ensure" it. You can ask the editor in your cover letter to publish the papers together. The editor will decide if it is appropriate.

The premise

I should NOT include several different types of experiments covering multiple topics, all in a single paper

would depend on the topic and journal.

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    And if the implications are obvious, then they may not be novel enough to get published at all.
    – Buffy
    Oct 21, 2021 at 21:52
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    It might be a thing to ask the editor first. They would know their field and the implications better than we do in a generic case. Oct 21, 2021 at 22:12
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As Prof. Santa Claus writes in a comment, you can write a series of papers with titles "Blah blah blah: Part I", "Blah blah blah: Part II", and so on. It's then obvious to the editors of the journal that they should be published together. Note you'll have to send them all to the same journal, for obvious reasons, and be sure to say they should be published together as well in the cover letter. Most journals these days have policies to upload papers as soon as they're ready and not hold them to compile into an issue, but when the papers are clearly part of the same parcel, they can make an exception.

I'm afraid if some gets rejected and some not, then someone might read my published paper, get the same idea as me, and then beat me to publishing on those other areas.

I don't know the details, of course, but this strikes me as improbable - they would have to read your paper, do the experiment, and then get through the peer review process faster than you. Given that your paper is already written and submitted, it's unlikely anyone will beat you to publishing it.

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