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Today I try to cite the news about the first person getting vaccinated all over the world from this link.

When I used the Mendeley extension from Google Chrome to cite the article in my word document, it shows as:

After one year since the beginning of the pandemic, since a UK grandmother receiving the first COVID-19 vaccine shot in the world (Anon n.d.).

Anon. n.d. “Covid-19 Vaccine: First Person Receives Pfizer Jab in UK - BBC News.” Retrieved August 19, 2021 (https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-55227325).

In another academic paper, I saw the same paper being cited as (BBC, 2021).

I am wondering whether the way that Mendeley cites the newspaper in my case is correct?

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    This has nothing to do with Mendeley. The correctness of the given citation depends on the citation format you are using.
    – henning
    Aug 19, 2021 at 8:06

1 Answer 1

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This difference has to do with the referencing style, the reference type, or the fields that have been inputted in Mendeley. If your website reference is not being displayed as you would like it to be, you may have to adjust the reference style within the MS Word Plugin. In addition, Mendeley does not always recognize the correct 'type' for a reference. You can adjust this by going to the 'Details' tab on the right side, and selecting the 'Type' dropdown menu. Here, you can change the type to 'Web Page' or whichever is most fitting, and this may change how the reference appears. Lastly, you may have to manually input information into fields such as 'Authors' or 'Year' (e.g. BBC and 2021) to fill in any missing information that Mendeley may not have automatically extracted from the article. I find that Mendeley is much more accurate at pulling metadata from journal articles than from news articles or websites.

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  • Great answer! A screenshot or two illustrating where various menus/tabs/etc appear on the screen might be helpful as well. I know you've described it, but a visual might be useful for some. Apr 27, 2022 at 2:16

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