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This journal has an impact score and impact factor:

  • Impact Score 5.94
  • Impact Factor 6.714 (2019)

The journal Impact Factor is the average number of times articles from the journal published in the past two years have been cited in the JCR year.

The Impact Factor is calculated by dividing the number of citations in the JCR year by the total number of articles published in the two previous years. An Impact Factor of 1.0 means that, on average, the articles published one or two year ago have been cited one time. An Impact Factor of 2.5 means that, on average, the articles published one or two year ago have been cited two and a half times. Citing articles may be from the same journal; most citing articles are from different journals.

For example, the journal PLoS Biology's 2010 impact factor is 12.472.

This was calculated thusly:

5076 - total of all citations from 2010 articles to PLoS Biology articles published in 2009 (1971) and 2008 (3105) divided by 407 - total of PLoS Biology articles published in 2009 (195) and 2008 (212) = 12.472

The number by itself does not mean as much. If you knew that the journal with the highest impact factor has the number 94.333, you might think 12.472 was quite low. But when you look at the impact factors of all the Biology journals indexed by JCR, PLoS Biology is ranked No. 1 in the Biology subject category.

https://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/c.php?g=147746&p=967441

Everything I am finding keeps talking about impact factor. The info of another journal makes it seem like they are the same, since only "impact score" is listed.

However, if both are listed like the first journal/link, which one should be used?

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    The journal does not have an "impact score." Resurchify has an "impact score" for the journal, which they probably made up. Jul 3 at 10:30
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The page you linked says it (almost) all:

The impact score (IS), also denoted as Journal impact score (JIS), of an academic journal is a measure of the yearly average number of citations to recent articles published in that journal. It is based on Scopus data.

Both these measures are variations of "average citations received per article", but they are computed on a slightly different database and so they give different results. The Impact Factor is the most well known and recognized, but many alternatives have appeared, also since the IF database is paywalled and does not include some fringe journals.

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The impact factor (If), also denoted as Journal impact factor (JIF), of an academic journal is a measure of the yearly average number of citations to recent articles published in that journal. It is based on Web of Science data.

The impact score (IS), also denoted as Journal impact score (JIS), of an academic journal is a measure of the yearly average number of citations to recent articles published in that journal. It is based on Scopus data.

https://www.resurchify.com/impact/details/14875

CiteScore is another metric for measuring journal impact in Scopus. The calculation of CiteScore for the current year is based on the number of citations received by a journal in the latest 4 years (including the calculation year), divided by the number of documents published in the journal in those four years.

https://libguides.lb.polyu.edu.hk/journalimpact/citescore#sthash.LxZdZLH3.dpbs

Therefore, for lesser known journals that have both, it makes sense to put them in this form:

  • Impact Score 7.14 (2019, Scopus data)
  • Impact Factor 6.714 (2019, Web of Science data)

Then I just wonder if it's better to list the journal's impact factor for the most current year or from the year the article was published...

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