4

So I just saw this and found it kind of funny, a bit weird, I guess flattering and wondered if he should have at least asked me or gave me some credit and is he allowed to do this as the professor? !

I got a 100/100 in this 2000 words assignment for his course and today I decided to see the essay-like solution he posted for everyone to see, and there are complete paragraphs exactly the same as mine, even the commas. I didn't rediscover anything with this assignment, the topic is not new, but the expressions, the writing and the ideas are all mine.

Anyway I am not gonna say anything to him but I did laugh at the thought that if I ever use my answer again in a similar topic imagine if then I am accused of plagiarism from myself and/or him :)

(btw English is not my first language sorry for any mistakes)

14
  • 5
    He should give you credit. Period. The more if he is so fond of your submission. Nov 1 '20 at 4:29
  • 8
    He may not be allowed to give you credit, depending on the privacy laws of the area the university is operating in.
    – nick012000
    Nov 1 '20 at 8:29
  • 1
    credits as in acknowledgment of him using complete parts of my assignment, not marks since he already gave me full marks anyway. He only omitted parts that I had rephrased from other sources (I included references). Assignments are confidential, so maybe he could have not used my words or he could have said that the solutions are based on students assignments. I think what bothers me mostly is because the Uni is so strict with plagiarism as do all, & he specifically mentions in every assignment that lack of citations will result in consequences &then he does this. "Do as you teach..."
    – Marilou
    Nov 1 '20 at 9:45
  • 4
    @nick012000: In which parts of the world it is the legal thing to not notify the student, not asking them for permission, not crediting them but publishing their works? Sounds very weird to me.
    – user111388
    Nov 1 '20 at 13:34
  • 2
    @user111388: I suspect that FERPA makes it legally tricky to publish names of students when you're a lecturer in the US. This is why you will occasionally see "the following solution was found by a student" rather than "the following solution was found by X Y" in my model solutions. That said, when I use multiple solutions or copy them word by word, I usually ask for permission from the respective students, since it otherwise reeks of plagiarism (although lots of researchers don't seem to regard plagiarism as a real thing when it comes to teaching materials). Nov 1 '20 at 16:13
8

Yes, this is both flattering and weird. I would call it unprofessional and tacky.

He should have thanked you for the nice answer and asked your permission to post parts of it.

Whether you should have public credit for that work may depend on policies at your school and on how you and the instructor think about the impact of such an announcement on other students.

Do stick with this:

Anyway I am not gonna say anything to him but I did laugh at the thought that if I ever use my answer again in a similar topic imagine if then I am accused of plagiarism from myself and/or him :)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.