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Can I write my affiliation from as current university though I did my work in my previous university? I want to publish a paper from my previous work, my current university has the access to the journal. I do not want to put any professor as coauthor in my paper. So can I use current university as affiliation?

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  • You can include a footnote on the first page saying where the work was done (I did this once when I relocated to a new job when the paper was under review) or you could include this information in an Acknowledgments section at the end. However, I'm pretty sure your current affiliation should be used for your "official affiliation". By the way, what does your current university having access to the journal have to do with this issue? Whether or not your current university has access to the journal seems entirely unrelated to your question. Or am I overlooking something? Oct 17, 2020 at 9:52
  • Are we talking practically or ethically? Oct 17, 2020 at 14:12
  • @IanSudbery, why the distinction? How does ethics apply unless there was funding that needs to be acknowledged?
    – Buffy
    Oct 17, 2020 at 14:52
  • Practically, the clear answer is yes - its just a case of pressing the right keys on the keyboard. It is unlikely any one is going to check where the work was carried out (how would they even do that?). There are definite benefits to saying the work is affiliated with your new university, even if that is not true. Universities are judged on the quality of the papers associated with them. In the UK, this is financial - universities get £100k from the government for every "4*" paper they publish. They also use rankings in advertising. TT/probation requirements might depend on work done "here". Oct 17, 2020 at 15:08

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There are two ways of handling this that I can think of, but regardless, I'm pretty sure your current affiliation should be used for your "official affiliation".

  1. You can include a footnote or some other appropriate comment on the first page that says where the work was done. I did this once when I relocated to a new job while the paper was under review. See Additional information here (which appears without the label "Additional information" at the bottom of the first page of the actual paper).

  2. You can include this information in an Acknowledgments section at the end.

In my case, we simply told our contact editor during the proof stage, after acceptance, that the work was done before a job change, and the journal decided how to handle this. This is surely something that occurs not all that infrequently for the journal (and presumably also for most any journal), so I suspect what they did was in their editors' "style manual" (or whatever passes for one at the journal).

My feeling is that if you include this information in an Acknowledgments section, then you probably don't need to say anything before doing so. If you'd rather not do this in an Acknowledgements section, then because journals often have certain styles for first page information and for footnotes, it's probably best to ask your contact editor, after acceptance, how they wish this to be handled.

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