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I've read the other questions on active vs passive voice. But my question is slightly different.

Let's say I'm writing in active voice and using "I" as I'm primarily writing a thesis-like document. When I present results, is it okay to say "we" as a way include the audience? For example, consider the following paragraph:

Option 1: "I used algorithm X to perform Y on data Z. [...] In Figure 1, we can see that A is greater than B."

Is that acceptable? Or is it more proper to rewrite as:

Option 2: "I used algorithm X to perform Y on data Z. [...] In Figure 1, I show that A is greater than B."

My intuition tells me option 2 is more correct; however it just sounds slightly awkward to me in certain places. Are there better/other options than the aforementioned options?

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Apart from issues of singular versus plural first-person in active voice, ... it is often possible to use third-person (active), simultaneously shorten the sentence, and perhaps only refer to the objects, phenomena, and processes in play. E.g "Application of procedure X to stuff Y produced whatever-Z..." (Or "Procedure X applied to stuff Y ...")

That is, often, "unwinding" the grammar can show that there are redundant or functionless phrases, which can be dropped, and in fact clarify.

(In my field, mathematics, in English, in the U.S., there certainly is a tradition to use plural first person, but, truly, I've found that often unwinding the grammar allows shortening. And, often, unwinding allows active voice rather than passive, and shortens and simplifies.)

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This depends to a very large extend on the field. In my field there is a very strong sense that using "we" in a single authored paper is completely inappropriate. You make the argument, so don't hide behind some annonymous others by using we. If you make a statement, then make that unambigous by using I.

In other disciplines the use of we is more common.

So the best thing you can do is look at your intended audience, and find out what they expect. It is much easier to communicate if your style corresponds to their expectectations. You could try to fight those expectations, but that is a very hard fight, which you will likely loose. So I would recommend against that. After all getting your research across effectively is much more important than opinions about "proper" style.

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Technically, you can, but I've never seen it used in a paper.

This is borderline to a personal opinion, but based on what the papers I read, the 'pedagogical "we"' is rarely used in a paper or thesis (I have seen it used in summer schools, but never in talks). In such situations, authors tend to use the neutral 'one' (as in 'one sees from figure X, that' or 'plugging equation (a) into relation (b), one obtains'), which is a bit clumsy but apparently the accepted solutions.

My personal opinion is that the 'pedagogical "we"' comes across as somewhat condescending ("How are we doing today?"), but again, that's just a personal opinion. In the end, it is your paper.

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You can use:

I used algorithm X to perform Y on data Z. [...] In Figure 1, we can see that A is greater than B.

or

I used algorithm X to perform Y on data Z. [...] In Figure 1, I show that A is greater than B.

I prefer the former, since you performed the operation and we can see the results. However, I'd opt for:

We can use algorithm X to perform Y on data Z. [...] In Figure 1, we can see that A is greater than B.

Because both you and the reader can use the algorithm.

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