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Which of these two is better accepted, or preferred, for scientific papers?

THIS

The model detaches the calculation of the vertical velocity from the equations system, and focuses on the longitudinal velocities instead, leaving the model as a 2D equations system. [Mintgen, 2018] provides a description for the properties, characteristics and limitations of SWE in a detailed manner, some of which will be further addressed an extended for a deeper analysis in Section 2.1.

OR

The model detaches the calculation of the vertical velocity from the equations system, and focuses on the longitudinal velocities instead, leaving the model as a 2D equations system. In his dissertation, Florian Mintgen [Mintgen, 2018] provides a description for the properties, characteristics and limitations of SWE in a detailed manner, some of which will be further addressed an extended for a deeper analysis in Section 2.1.

Or if you have any other accepted way of doing it, please feel free. Thank you

References

[Mintgen, 2018] Mintgen, G. F. (2018). Coupling of Shallow and Non-Shallow Flow Solvers An Open Source Framework. Dissertation, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen.

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    It's mostly a matter of personal preference, but note that using the citation as a noun allows you to separate (somewhat) the work from the researchers. In particular, if you have to refute or criticise a paper then this style makes it less likely to be interpreted as a personal attack. – eru-cs Jul 28 at 13:34
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    If you are going to submit your paper to a journal, the journal will have a preferred style. Best to check it now rather than having to change all your references the day you want to submit... – astronat Jul 28 at 13:50
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    My field (biomedical) mostly uses numerical index so the first method is foreign to me. A tangential comment is that for the 2nd example, there is no need to mention that it's from dissertation, it does not add anything. Omitting it can also omit the gender pronoun, which can sometimes be hard to determine for names that apply to multiple genders or in foreign languages. – Penguin_Knight Jul 28 at 14:33
  • @eru-cs If you write "Smith et. al's study [26]" or "Miller's algorithm [16]", the statement is about the work and not the researchers. – lighthouse keeper Jul 29 at 6:31
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There’s no unique answer to this as citation styles (in text or in bibliography) are somewhat personal or institutional. Some good ways of getting guidance include

  1. Get one or more previous theses on the same topic and follow those models,
  2. Look up established journals in the field and use their models (if they have a common one).

I personally prefer your second alternative but would then use numbered referencing to avoid name repetition, v.g. “In his dissertation [1], Mintgen ...”

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