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I've been looking for some statistics that shed light into the professional society/association market of academia. Some questions I'm looking to answer in addition to the title are:

How many societies does a single scientist belong to at a given time? For those that are members, what are the average annual fees associated with their membership(s)? Overall, how much revenue do these societies generate from membership fees?

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    Note that most, perhaps all, reputable professional societies are explicitly not for profit. So, the revenue gets put back into the organization in some way - conferences and publications mostly. The officers are normally elected and not paid, though editors and other professional staff of their journals, likely are paid. – Buffy Jun 29 at 17:43
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    Many societies publish annual budget reports that are either online or for their membership. I would suggest you do some legwork for the finances. For example, 20 seconds on Google helped me find the ASA's budget information community.amstat.org/blogs/ronald-wasserstein/2014/02/10/… – Richard Erickson Jun 29 at 17:54
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    Note that sometimes the motivation to join a professional society is just "it saved me money on a conference fee". – Federico Poloni Jun 29 at 18:27
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    @FedericoPoloni - for some you get membership rolled into the conference registration fee (the Materials Research Society is one, there likely are others). This can help with getting reimbursements for your membership from your institution/company. – Jon Custer Jun 29 at 20:39
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    I'll guess that all you will find are anecdotal reports. I belonged to one association (ACM) and might have joined one other (IEEE), more or less sensibly. My "dues" were around $450US per year, but that included membership in a few SIGs and their journal and newsletter publications. If I'd stayed with math, there are probably two I'd have joined. I'll guess that is fairly typical, but I have no general numbers. – Buffy Jun 29 at 22:05