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Last week I had an interview for a faculty position. I haven't received any response yet. But today one of my papers received best paper award in an esteemed IEEE conference.

Is it professional, and wise to share this information via email to concerned people at the hiring committee? I don't want to look like very childish or eager for this position (although I am eager because the university is among the top-ranked in China). But I want to share this info - who knows it may have a positive impact on the decision!

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  • The thing I'm definitely weary about is mentioning an "esteemed IEEE conference". IEEE is now essentially a label you can buy for money. It would be better to speak of "a top conference", "an A-ranked conference" etc. if that applies. May 25 '20 at 9:23
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    @lighthousekeeper Why not the conference name?
    – GoodDeeds
    May 25 '20 at 9:42
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    @GoodDeeds Oh yes, absolutely. One should mention both the conference name and the fact that it's a top/A-ranked conference, if that applies. (Still agnostic about the actual question if it's a good idea.) May 25 '20 at 9:46
  • The conference name is IEEE WCNC @lighthousekeeper
    – Sjaffry
    May 25 '20 at 10:05
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    The word "esteemed" is an anti-word. Don't use it, it is often associated with scam conferences (e.g. invitations with the words "Esteemed Professor" are almost certainly scam invitations). This is one example where a positive word has turned into its precise negative. May 25 '20 at 12:46

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