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Say there is a disabled person who wants to have B.Sc degree in Computer Science.

He knows he has the option of college and other manual jobs.

I want to know are there any other easier evaluation processes for that student who understands the subject matter but cannot answer the traditional questions on the paper like other ten students because these questions require creativity and he doesn't have that talent?

If there are other evaluation processes why aren't they implemented in real life? And if they are implemented which university allows such implementations in Canada and USA?

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    I am confused as to the nature of the disability - a lack of creativity? – Azor Ahai -- he him May 5 at 21:05
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    Most universities have policies to handle students with learning disabilities. I think your best bet would be to contact the institutions you are interested in and ask them about those policies. – GrayLiterature May 5 at 21:14
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    Hmmm @Cell, would you say that to Stephen Hawking? – Buffy May 5 at 21:55
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    I, too, am confused by your use of the word "creativity". And a disability could be purely physical, not a learning disability. Cerebral Palsy is an especially difficult case. – Buffy May 5 at 21:58
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    @Buffy That's totally irrelevant. This question involves someone claiming to know the material, but not being able to demonstrate it through answering exam questions. There is no mention of physical disability or psychological disability unrelated to cognitive thinking/problem solving. If you get paid to do something, you're definitely a professional. – Cell May 5 at 22:18
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Are there other evaluation processes besides traditional to evaluate disabled person at university based on their understanding of the subject matter?

Yes, they are called accommodations.

I want to know are there any other easier evaluation processes

If the student is assessed using accommodations, the assessment will be different. It will not necessarily be easier. Typically, the student is required to demonstrate the same course-specific skills as the other students. Example: a test is checking to see if a student knows about widgets. Most students will answer writing by hand. A student receiving accommodations might answer verbally. The accommodation would be easier with respect to writing, but the same with respect to knowledge of widgets, because that is what the assessment is about.

If there are other evaluation processes why aren't they implemented in real life?

They very often are.

And if they are implemented which university allows such implementations in Canada and USA?

In the USA, universities are required by law to provide accommodations to students with disabilities. I am not familiar with Canada, but I am sure there is something similar.

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  • I am confused by the downvotes here. This seems like a very reasonable answer. – Dawn May 6 at 3:40

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