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I have received an e-mail from "Advances in Engineering". Is it a predatory-platform? Is it reputable?

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Dear Dr. XYZ,

We are pleased to inform you that Advances in Engineering selection committee identified your paper “Another XYZ” as a key scientific article contributing to research excellence. We would like to write a feature about your paper and highlight it in our next edition of Advances in engineering news series.

AIE highlight papers of exceptional scientific importance to a broad science and engineering audience (for the latest edition https://advancesENG.com). The feature is intended to globally disseminate research excellence across academia and in the wider community, and to inspire new research directions.

AIE reaches a global audience of 850,000 professors and scientists per month who seek the key research news and accomplishments in engineering. Papers featured at AIE gain extensive visibility and increased citations.

If you accept our special invitation, our professional writers will write a high quality feature draft about your research paper (significance of the work done) and then share it with you for final approval.

AIE is not-for-profit focused on serving research excellence. However, there is a small nominal fee for featuring key scientific articles at AIE ($75 USD total fee) to cover AIE writers’ time in preparing the feature. We can send you an official invoice and we will feature your research within 14 days.

At AIE, we highlight the researchers work at the cutting edge of science, those who are developing the innovations that will lead to a brighter tomorrow. I look forward to hearing from you.

Respectfully,

ZYX

ZYX, PhD MBA VP Scientific affairs, Advances in Engineering

38 Auriga Drive, Suite 200. Ottawa, ON K2E 8A5, Canada

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    You shouldn't need to ask this question. An email that starts with "We are pleased to inform you that Advances in Engineering selection committee identified your paper 'Another XYZ' as a key scientific article contributing to research excellence." should be moved into your spam folder. – Roland Jan 29 at 8:09
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    @AnonymousPhysicist ... seek an assessment ... – scaaahu Jan 29 at 9:39
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    I don't see how seeking an assessment makes this a shopping question. – Allure Jan 29 at 10:06
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    And how is this a duplicate? The question is not about a journal. @Wrzlprmft – Anonymous Physicist Jan 29 at 10:52
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    @AnonymousPhysicist: I closed as a duplicate because it is pointing the asker and other visitors having the same question in the right direction. This does not make the question any less shopping. As the question assumes that the service in question is a journal, I went by that. For whatever it’s worth, JiK’s answer aligns with one of the red flags in the proposed duplicate. If there is an important distinction to be made here, we can create a new canonical question on how evaluate the reputation of whatever kind of service this is. – Wrzlprmft Jan 29 at 12:01
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A human writing to you about your research would say something about your research and say how it contributes to research excellence. Spam bots tend to use a general template and refer to your research in a way that is easy to automate, for example, copy your title in verbatim.

We are pleased to inform you that Advances in Engineering selection committee identified your paper “Another XYZ” as a key scientific article contributing to research excellence. We would like to write a feature about your paper and highlight it in our next edition of Advances in engineering news series.

This clearly falls to the spam category.

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  • You'd think so. However, I've received e-mails from reputable journals that start exactly like this. – mmeent Jan 29 at 15:27
  • @mmeent maybe the reputable journals are also using machine-generated emails? The two aren't mutually exclusive. – Allure Jan 29 at 21:42
  • There are many reputable organization (conferences/journals) sends machine-generated e-mails. – Kutadgubilig Jan 30 at 10:35
  • @Kutadgubilig Do they ask you to republish existing papers? – JiK Jan 30 at 10:45
  • I mean, what reputable conference or journal contacts you simply about a single paper you have already published somewhere else? – JiK Jan 30 at 10:46
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It is predatory, in the sense that they seek payment for services that are not useful. It is not, however, a journal.

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  • What makes you say publicizing one's paper is not useful? There're plenty of reputable venues that do it, e.g. New Scientist, space.com, Physics Today, etc. – Allure Jan 29 at 10:07
  • @Allure I didn't say that. It's not useful publicity. Physics Today is at least a bit useful. I don't read the other two. – Anonymous Physicist Jan 29 at 10:47
  • The question also didn't say that. – Anonymous Physicist Jan 29 at 10:49
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    Well, as it's currently written your answer says "...services that are not useful", which is what led to my comment. If you didn't mean that, might want to edit. – Allure Jan 29 at 11:45

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