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I wrote a paper and it has been in limbo for more than a year because I need to re-write the code in C++ to get more proof of my algorithm before sending it to a conference.
To avoid being scooped, I considered putting it on arXiv, but was wary of exposing the algorithm to the public and I heard that it messes with the conference reviewer's double blind review.

So if arXiv and HAL archives do not have the option to keep a paper private, would uploading the paper to GitHub in a private repository serve as proof if I ever need to prove that I came up with the idea first, if I've been scooped? This way, I would be able to give private access to the repository to whoever is investigating. I wonder if this would get counted as scooping if the person who scooped the idea never knew about my paper because it was in a hidden private repository.

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  • I'm no kind of lawyer. What is the normal way to establish such things? I don't think arXiv or GitHub are good ways to establish copyright on intellectual property. But I could be wrong. Also, if you want to present it at a conference, maybe the conference organizers should be consulted about such policies?
    – puppetsock
    Jan 10 '20 at 19:57
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    Reddit discussion about the usability of github as a flag-planting tool. Short summary: It's not trivial. Git commit dates (both of them) can be set arbitrarily, so they prove nothing. Use git commits made through the github web interface, or publish hashes of your work (Newton did something like this when he discovered calculus). Jan 10 '20 at 21:35
  • I'd also wager that most worries on priority scooping seem to be exaggerated. (And from looking into historical reviews and wide-spread credit (such as naming) for some popular things I had a feeling that naming and fame do not necessarily happen on the priority basis. It seems to be almost random!) So, my recommendation is: The best you can do is publish early and publish visibly (arXiv is visible enough). The history (with capital H) will then sort it out anyway. Jan 11 '20 at 1:02
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would uploading the paper to GitHub in a private repository serve as proof if I ever need to prove that I came up with the idea first, if I've been scooped?

You can prove you came up with the idea first, but you can still be scooped, since credit will be given to the first public work.

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