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My son is in his second year at a UK univ. It guarantees accommodation just for first...students rent privately themselves. It discretions other year. For privacy, I won't say his degree. We live in Canada. Given vacations, he's in the UK for just 7 months. We thought extended stay hotel is best. First, waste money to lease a flat 12 months! Second, stupid buy appliances and furniture, then sell them at loss when he finishes.

Anyways, his univ. requires address and he put extended-stay hotel. Someone leaked because many instructors ask him if he's staying in a hotel, but he never told them! Some students overheard and now many think he's Crazy Rich Asian! LMAO! He tried to explain we are not rich and extended stay hotel comes out cheaper. But no use!

  1. Can he do anything to change this mentality of students and staff?

  2. Is extended-stay hotel this un-ordinary for academics and students?

  3. Don't visit academicians that visit just 6 months' stay there?

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    This question doesn't have anything to do with academia. It would be the same if your son has a job. I suggest this question would be more appropriate for interpersonal.stackexchange.com – Anonymous Physicist Jan 7 at 10:58
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    I'm surprised about the hotel being cheaper, because university towns usually come with a large amount of purpose-built student accomodation; tiny flats with their own furniture. – pjc50 Jan 7 at 15:30
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    Don't know the current situation, but 15 years ago it was easy to rent a furnished room in a shared house for a few months in the UK. – Ivana Jan 7 at 16:47
  • No idea about UK, but here (Germany) we have so-called "Monteurzimmer" [literally room for service technicians]. These are furnished apartments that are rented out for durations of typically weeks to a few months. OTOH, in university towns, furnished apartments are usually to be had and renting for just the term are is not unusual. 3rd possibility would be to look for a room sublet by a student doing a term abroad. – cbeleites unhappy with SX Jan 7 at 17:00
  • Seen the edit, but I don't have much more advice (and even if I did, the question has been closed). – Federico Poloni Apr 5 at 20:07
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Can he do anything to change this mentality of students and staff?

Moving out won't help now that the voice has spread. Looking stingy in ordinary expenses will further stereotype you into a Scrooge Mc Duck type, so do not try to overcompensate by saving pennies. Just live a normal life. Do not drive to campus in a Lamborghini or a taxi, but do not reuse tea bags.

I am afraid it will take time and personal interaction to fix this and get across one's real personalities. Stereotypes exist exactly because they are easy to form.

On the bright side, as far as stereotypes go, it's not a particularly bad one.

Is extended-stay hotel this un-ordinary for academics and students?

For students, in my experience it is quite unusual. In many universities there are student dorms, of course, but they are aimed especially as students and they are a different thing.

For academics, it is more common; see below.

Don't visit academicians that visit just 6 months' stay there?

Yes. 1-6 month visits are very tricky to arrange from the logistics point of view: too long for a hotel, too short to make renting an apartment convenient. This kind of furnished accommodation is a godsend.

Nowadays these visits are reasonably common, but it is not unheard of that some academics, especially older ones, never went to one or hosted a long-term visitor. You basically need a semester free from teaching to do it, and once you have a family a long trip is a lot more tricky to arrange.

For this reason I would suggest you not to worry about faculty; things will fix themselves, and most faculty at least tries to be objective and not let these stereotypes influence them. For your own social life, convincing students that you are not Paris Hilton is your #1 priority. How to do it is is off-topic here though. As another stereotype says, we academics are not so competent about social interaction. :) So treat also my first paragraphs with a pinch of salt.

I would suggest you to head over at [interpersonal.se].

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    "Do not drive to campus in a Lamborghini or a taxi" LMAO!!! No he doesn't do that. – Daniel Park Apr 5 at 19:57
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I understand your concern. This sometimes can be frustrating if it is really impacting the student's academic freedom or anything. The best option is to "IGNORE". There is no point in explaining all this to students and staff. Is it worth putting effort into changing people's mentality? There are other issues to take care of during academic studies. Your son should better focus on everything other than this.

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I think there is absolutely no need to try change someone's perspectives on subjective matters. Your son told the truth and that is all that matters as honesty is very important in academia. However, I do not see a point in explaining himself over and over again to people not willing to believe him.

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he's in the UK for just 7 months...We thought extended stay hotel is best. First, waste money to lease a flat 12 months! Second, stupid buy appliances and furniture, then sell at a loss when he finishes.

Leases shorter than ten months are common and many properties are fully equipped.

many think he's Crazy Rich Asian! LMAO! We are not Rich. He tried to explain he's not rich and extended stay hotel comes out cheaper. But no use! Can he do anything to change this mentality of students and staff? Is extended-stay hotel this un-ordinary for academics and students? Don't visit academicians that visit just 6 months' stay there?

I've never heard of an extended stay hotel nor any student/academic using one, short-term leases, possibly in university owned property, are more common. Regarding chang[ing] this mentality, the maths is surely straightfoward:

extended stay hotel < lease

Whether that's true depends on your initial calculations. A quick search reveals a student budget calculator for the UK. Taking the University of Cambridge as an example: Accommodation is £231 per month, with term starting in Oct and ending in Jun, that's at least a nine month contract, totalling at least £2079. You can repeat those calculations for your son's university, which should provide a solid argument.

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  • Kids tell me University of Cambridge guarantees accommodation all years. But some UK unis don't. – Daniel Park Apr 5 at 19:58

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