4

I have submitted a manuscript to a CS conference, and it was rejected but with decent scores given by the reviewers (just under the accept treshold). If I list the manuscript as a preprint in my CV, is it OK to mention that I submitted to that conference and it got rejected with those scores? This version of the CV would not be publicly accessible.

3 Answers 3

8

What is OK and what is wise may not be the same thing. I doubt that this would be wise. Instead, I'd list it as "in preparation" if you intend to revise and submit elsewhere. Showing work in progress is a good thing and forward looking. Being rejected is less of a good thing, and also backward looking.

3
  • Do you think mentioning rejection with "weak accept" reviews from a good conference would always be a negative? My situation is that I have no publications in the area of the conference (theoretical CS) and I'm planning on applying for phd positions in it.
    – Laakeri
    Dec 24, 2019 at 21:14
  • 2
    Certainly more negative than positive.
    – Buffy
    Dec 24, 2019 at 21:18
  • 1
    I agree. "In Prep" is the way to go, but be clear on what it is in prep for. "In preparation, to be submitted to X CONFERENCE, YEAR". Listing an "almost, but rejected" on your CV gives you nothing. Listing the possibility of a good acceptance shows what your are actively working on and that you are familiar with the field. You aren't even a PhD student yet, you aren't expected to have many, or even any, publications. Dec 24, 2019 at 23:05
4

Scores alone without the associated reviews have only little informative value, since the final decision usually does not depend on a threshold, but on a discussion between PC members. Maybe the reviewers who gave a positive score were "informed outsiders", whereas the most expert reviewer saw a major flaw and fought against the paper's acceptance? From just looking at the scores, we can't know. Therefore, I would be skeptical if I was reading your CV and saw this entry.

1

You should not. CVs are for factual information. Review scores are opinions, not facts.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .