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I am in the process of applying to Ph.D. programs and I am asked to list my previous institutions along with dates attended. It should be a straightforward question but in my situation: I attended institution X from 2013-2015, got an A.A., then went to institution Y from 2015-2017 for my B.S., but in between I took classes at institution X over the Summer of 2016. Institution X is in my hometown and I was there over the Summer of 2016, so it was convenient to knock out some credits while back home.

Because of this, it is also a bit confusing as to whether I should list my GPA from institution X at the degree confer date, or to list my cumulative GPA (which factors in the classes I took over the 2016 Summer), as both show up on my transcript. It seems like a minor issue but I want to make sure it doesn't appear as if I'm misleading the admissions committee in any way. Any thoughts would be appreciated!

Edit: The format on most applications is: "Date Attended: From-- to--" without the option of listing several date ranges.

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The format on most applications is: "Date Attended: From-- to--" without the option of listing several date ranges.

Just put your earliest attended date to your latest, unless it specifically asks for dates related to your AA. Don't overthink it!

Because of this, it is also a bit confusing as to whether I should list my GPA from institution X at the degree confer date, or to list my cumulative GPA

Again, unless it specifically asks for your AA GPA, I would list your cumulative (I assume it's not much different in any case).

Details of your associate's degree are not going to be a deciding factor in your PhD admissions. Plus, it's likely your transcript lists your AA and cumulative GPA separately anyway (mine from my four-year undergraduate university does), if they truly care.

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