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If I would to advertise my research project in magazine to recruit participants, do you know what the steps will be?

Thank you everyone

closed as unclear what you're asking by Morgan Rodgers, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩, cag51, Enthusiastic Engineer, Jon Custer Sep 23 at 18:43

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  • What do you want to recruit? – Anonymous Physicist Sep 19 at 22:46
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    Do you mean recruit for subjects for a study? Or just promote your research so that prospective students will be drawn to your university. Sorry, but it is ambiguous. – Buffy Sep 20 at 0:29
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First step:

Make sure your relevant regulatory committee (for example, an Institutional Review Board/IRB in the US) approves of the language in the advertisement. Example guidance from my institution that makes it clear the IRB needs to approve of your advertisement:

https://kb.wisc.edu/hsirbs/page.php?id=29560

IRBs will consider whether recruitment processes, including advertisements could affect the equitable selection of participants, or be unduly coercive or misleading. IRBs will consider the content, design and mode of communication of any advertisements in making this determination.

Don't skip step 1.

The rest of the steps are outside the scope of Academia.SE, but involve contacting whoever manages the advertising in the venue you are posting to.

  • Might also need to deal with your Title 9 office or any similar bodies outside the US to make sure that you aren’t sex discriminating or anything. – nick012000 Sep 19 at 23:05
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    @nick012000 I'm not aware of separate involvement of title IX folk in the process, though the IRB guidelines and assessment would include assessment of sex (and other) discrimination if applicable, included as "equitable selection of participants" in the quote above. That said, and it likely wasn't your intention, "aren’t sex discriminating or anything" comes across to me as a bit of a flippant phrasing. – Bryan Krause Sep 19 at 23:13

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