0

What kind of questions are asked by the adviser?

What sort of questions do you ask your advisor during an online interview?

Also, Which one do you choose during the interview; turn the webcam on or off?

If the interview goes well, and the advisor asks you when you can you join the group, but you have other interviews coming up (or you are waiting for them), how do you answer his/her question?

closed as too broad by scaaahu, Anyon, Scientist, Buzz, StrongBad Aug 19 at 13:42

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • You are asking a lot of questions at once here, many of which are themselves very broad. Please try to reduce your question to a single one, ideally in such a way that the existing answer is invalidated as little as possible. – Wrzlprmft Aug 19 at 10:14
  • The answers are: it depends, it depends, on, "I need more time to think". – user111955 Aug 20 at 5:25
1

What kind of questions are asked by the adviser?

What sort of questions do you ask your advisor during an online interview?

I have experience of this on both sides.

As a supervisor, I want to determine whether the student has qualities that will allow him to succeed in the project and contribute to my research. In particular, I am interested to know how successful he has been in his studies, as it a sign of self-discipline, and I ask detailed questions about skills needed for the particular project (e.g., programming skills). I also pay attention to how easy it is to communicate with the student, e.g., whether he can precisely understand questions, answer them directly and in a clear way, etc. I also want to know his motivation and whether he wants to pursue an academic career or just get the degree and then search for a job outside science. Those who just want to get the degree are likely to make minimal effort during their project (just enough to get the degree), so I prefer those who want to pursue an academic career. Expecting this, students almost always say they intend to work in science, and then I ask why. There are also many other things.

As a student, I wanted to know about the project and, in particular, how helpful the project would be for my career, what I would learn by doing the project, how significant the project was, etc. There are also many important factors that you find out by doing your homework: the academic status of the prospective supervisor, his publications, citations, publications of his past students, careers of his past students, etc.

Also, Which one do you choose during the interview; turn the webcam on or off?

My advice is to turn it on, even if the supervisor doesn't. In this way you are more open, better show your reaction, create a better impression, etc.

If the interview goes well, and the advisor asks you when you can you join the group, but you have other interviews coming up (or you are waiting for them), how do you answer his/her question?

You can signal that you like everything and that you need some time to read more about the topic and take a final decision. You are not expected to take your decision instantly. It is a serious matter.

  • I think your wording about "just wanting a degree and then working in industry" is quite unfortunate. Why should those people not work as hard and what should be the problem with not wanting to work in academia? – user111955 Aug 18 at 21:43
  • @user111955 In my answer, I described my own approach, and other supervisors may have different approaches. My view is that if a student wants to work in industry or as an analyst or programmer, then he is not really motivated to work as hard as he can during his PhD or MS project, because it won't really matter for his future career outside science. If a student wants to work in academia, he is motivated to learn and do as much as he can. Every publication counts for a research career. The student will read a lot about the field of the project, and he will genuinely try to do his best. – Sandra Aug 18 at 21:49
  • @user111955 I saw some PhD students who wanted to work outside science. Their approaches to their PhD projects were rather formal: they asked their supervisors for concrete tasks and just did what was required. They were not much interested or excited about research. They saw it as a job that had to be done. They never came up with any interesting ideas or initiatives. They behaved like workers, not like researchers. You can still benefit from such students in terms of their contribution to your research if you direct them wisely, but I personally prefer working with true researchers. – Sandra Aug 18 at 21:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.