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I'm writing a scientific paper and I want to add the contribution of a book in my paper. Generally, we use to write like that way ''authors in this work present [1].....'' but this is the case when we are writing about any other scientific paper. But for the first time I'm using the reference of book, could you kindly elaborate how do I add the book reference that makes my work relevant.

Thanks in advance...

  • is there something this book that makes its contribution different from a paper? Scientific book is typically a collection of related papers. – Bald Bear Aug 2 at 17:23
  • @Bald Bear So you mean I should use the same way as I'm using for scientific paper??? – Shane Aug 2 at 18:10
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X, Y and Z present ABC [1].

is appropriate regardless of whether [1] is a technical report, published manuscript, thesis, chapter, book, ...

  • Thank you user2768 – Shane Aug 5 at 9:32
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Your form works perfectly well for books. I would go one step further and say that this form works for all kinds of writing (although the specific word "present" may be more suitable for some works than for others - but I guess you are not using the exact same sentence all the time anyway).

The only thing that may be specific for books is that it may be helpful to be a bit more exact about where in the book the argument that you relate to appears. In some disciplines (e.g., the humanities), you would be required to list chapter and page numbers (depending on style either in the text or the reference). I have seen a lot of STEM papers omit this, but I think even if the style guide of your journal / conference does not require you to list at least a chapter, it is a useful service to the reader to do so.

Further note that this advise only applies to monographs. For "chapter books", where each chapter is a little paper of their own written by different authors, it is customary to cite the specific chapter that your argument appears in. Your style guide most likely has requirements how to do this (cp. the @incollection bibtex entry type).

  • Thank you for the explanation. – Shane Aug 5 at 9:31

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