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This question has already been asked, albeit not so much, in this thread. This, however, still gets me thinking. I am an early career research (not even done with my PhD yet). A PhD candidate told me that despite all my papers being focused in one country, I am "all over the place." Meaning, my published works are in different fields (i.e. sociolinguistics, politics, anthropology, international relations) - all of which I have a good grasp with. What is common among all my publications are my ideological standpoints. I remained consistent.

My degrees are in area studies, and I did (and still does) all the researches for my degrees in the fields of sociolinguistics, the politics of language, and political rhetoric. Area Studies is so broad enough that it can be considered multi- and interdisciplinary.

However, will writing and being able to have my works published in various fields in the social sciences affect my profile (positively or negatively) when I apply for faculty positions in the future?

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    It's impossible to answer such a specific question about your situation in a way that will be useful to other readers. You could try to generalize the question so that it isn't so specific to your particular discipline. – Brian Borchers Jul 11 '19 at 3:02
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To give a general answer: If you can show you have a significant, long-running research agenda, i.e. if you can bind the different publication or most of them with a single narrative - than it's probably ok. Of course, expectations depend by field, country etc.

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Often these things depend on how you sell them when questioned about it. Working in a few different fields can be positive or negative, but often it can put you in a position to offer a unique perspective that people who only work in one area might not have. Also, people who have worked in A, B and C are often more adaptable and able to pick up D than someone who has spent their entire life working only on B.

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