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I am interested in submitting a workshop proposal for a top-tier conference related to my topic. I don't know whether this could be a good idea but this year I co-organized a workshop in a top-tier conference. I handled the speaker, funding and I really enjoyed although it was for women who made a contribution in the field .

I had quite good relations with some professors. However, I don't know whether asking them that I want to submit a workshop proposal is an acceptable idea. Of course, I am doing my research and trying to come up with a paper, but I want to lead a workshop in the field since it still emerging.

Another problem, my ex-supervisor who is bully still got recognition. I found that he is going to be a chair at the conference for a specific category and cannot hide anymore and have to face him anyway.

The question is: Is it a good idea to submit a workshop proposal by a first-year Ph.D. student?

P.S.I had two years of experience in this emerging field and I have been invited for a talk the last month and feedback was positive by professor attended the workshop.

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    What did your current advisor say when you asked them? – Bryan Krause Jul 5 at 16:23
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    "Is it a good idea to submit a workshop proposal by a first-year Ph.D. student?" is a question you should ask your advisor. They do not need to be specialized in your field (as odd as it is to me that anyone would do a PhD with an advisor not in 'their field' I appreciate that in some areas people have a narrow view of what 'their field' is). – Bryan Krause Jul 5 at 16:38
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    Monika, I did read your question. If the issue is your former supervisor, that is not at all clear, because that information is not until the third paragraph and is listed as "another problem" as if it is parenthetical to your main question. If your current advisor doesn't know about your history you probably need to make that history known so that they can advise you, especially since it seems to be so central to your life. – Bryan Krause Jul 5 at 17:05
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    Why would telling your current advisor lead your ex-supervisor to "destroy" you? – Bryan Krause Jul 5 at 17:08
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    Ok. Is there some resource at the university you are at now that you can take advantage of for counselling or mental health advice? It might be good for you to be able to talk all these things out with someone sworn to confidence and not involved in your field. – Bryan Krause Jul 5 at 17:30
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In theory, since your advisor agrees, there's nothing which stops you from submitting a workshop proposal as a PhD student. Your proposal will be evaluated by the conference organizers and they will decide whether they want to go forward or not with your workshop. If you submit this proposal completely on your own, I think there's a good chance that they will doubt that you can pull a successful workshop, and consequently reject the proposal. So in order to make the proposal more convincing you should probably partner with some experienced researchers who already have a reputation in the field. You will probably need an editorial board anyway. You seem to have good contacts so it should be reasonably easy, since they should be happy enough to co-organize if you tell them that you're going to take care of the logistics.

The problem with your ex-supervisor and his presence at the conference is something that only you can decide. If he has enough influence in the community to convince the organizers to reject your workshop, it's a shame but that would end things there. If not, it's for you to evaluate how much damage he might cause to you, to your career and to your workshop. But hopefully you and him would just behave professionally and leave each other be.

If you have friendly contacts with experienced researchers in the fields, I'd suggest that you discuss your concerns with them. Their advice would be precious as it would save you investing time in this if they think it's not reasonable, and save you some sleepless nights if they think it's completely fine.

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