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I live in Australia and hold a M.A. degree from the University of Hamburg.

That degree doesn't exist in Australia, so I can't get it acknowledged through the accrediting bodies.

What is the etiquette to present such a degree on a business card?

[Update] I refer to a particular degree in the area of child education and not to the term 'Master of Arts', which of course does exist in Australia.

  • The edit helps, but it's unclear what your concern is regarding the major not being offered in your country. For example, is this a legal issue, where you're not allowed to claim a degree that's not accredited by local bodies? – Nat Jun 18 at 6:15
  • @Nat Yes, that's basically is it. Not necessarily a 'legal issue', but more about reputation. If I receive a business card with a degree on it, I would assume that the degree has been earned in that country and meets their required standards. Not saying it wouldn't been met, but there is no one who could confirm that. – Carsten Hagemann Jun 18 at 6:56
  • Many UK universities allow the use of additional post-nominal letters, which indicate the university a degree was obtained from, e.g. Oxon for Oxford, Cantab for Cambridge, and so on. Would doing this help with what you want to do here? In your case it would be Carsten Hagemann MA(Hamburg). – Emma Jun 18 at 7:17
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I suggest that you present it as it was awarded, and perhaps list the university as well. Most people will accept it at face value, though you may get the occasional question about what it means.

Australia isn't so isolated that it can't accept international terminology.

This would be different if you are in a field that requires certain certification, but that is a question to be directed at those providing the cert.

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List the full name of the degree and the name of the university. It is is not uncommon for degrees from universities in other countries to have degrees which differ from degrees given by local universities. Your business card is your introduction so it can contain whatever you wish it to have on it.

  • Have you ever seen the full name of the degree and the name of the university on a business card? Which field was this? I have never seen a card like this. – user2768 Jun 18 at 7:33
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    I have seen business cards which were minimal and formal then some which were printed on both sides in multiple colors. This person was concerned with presenting his degree so that it wouldn’t be misleading. Your reaction to my suggestion gives me pause to reconsider. If his degree can not be easily shown it might be best to omit it. It depends on what information he feels is necessary to convey. Thank you for your comment. – Tom Jun 19 at 21:20
  • I see titles and post-nominal letters; I've also seen double-sided cards, multiple colours, etc.; I don't recall seeing details about degrees, that said, it is a matter of taste. – user2768 Jun 20 at 7:49
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I live in Australia and hold a M.A. degree...That degree doesn't exist in Australia

I started to wonder what Australia called an M.A., so I googled "MA Australia master of arts" and discovered Victoria University offering such degrees, e.g., https://www.vu.edu.au/courses/master-of-arts-hrat. So, it seems it does exist.

(The above previously appeared as a comment and the question has now been edited to add the following.)

I refer to a particular degree in the area of child education and not to the term 'Master of Arts', which of course does exist in Australia.

The particular name used by the awarding institute, the University of Hamburg, doesn't matter so much, the level of the qualification does.

What is the etiquette to present such a degree on a business card?

Use post-nominal letters, e.g.,

A. N. Other, M.A.
  • Australians do not usually use postnomial letters (they tend to be informal), and if they did they wouldn't have periods. For example "PhD" not "Ph.D." – Anonymous Physicist Jun 18 at 8:21
  • @AnonymousPhysicist Ultimately, it is all personal preference... Given that the OP wants to present information, I'm advising as to how to do it, and given that they write M.A., I followed that style. – user2768 Jun 18 at 9:06
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You shouldn't list a masters degree on a business card in Australia.

Educated Australians will know what a masters degree is. Edit: Australians will understand "Master of Arts in Child Education" just fine even if they've never met one before.

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    Maybe you should expand on your first sentence. Why? Or better, why not, if it happens to be your highest degree? – Buffy Jun 17 at 12:33
  • @Buffy It is just custom. The only degree I see on business cards is a PhD, and that is because it is a title. A masters is not a title in Australia. – Anonymous Physicist Jun 17 at 22:41

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